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Wide
12-12-2005, 06:10 PM
In this forum we will discuss, trade thoughts/techniques on all metalworking issues.

From simple torch welding to Mig, Tig production jig.

Bending, Hammering , annealing, finishing metal

Machine finishing, Lathe, milling machine, CNC, NC code.



Enjoy





:D :D

OldBikerGuy
12-12-2005, 06:16 PM
Man, this thread's gonna be a real chick magnet! :lol:

junior
12-12-2005, 06:25 PM
lol obg....

we've got some guys here who do quite a bit of their own fab work. if you might have either wanted to try something, or have bought a welder and haven't had any previous experience- you can post here and we can toss it around....

j

TexasFatBoy
12-12-2005, 06:27 PM
Very cool! I keep gettin' edumakated around here! B)

OldBikerGuy
12-12-2005, 06:30 PM
TFB, here's yer first lesson: Wide and Jr. have about 50 thousand dollars worth of welding equipment each! Smart money is on paying one of them to do it for you! :P

junior
12-12-2005, 06:37 PM
lol obg-

hardly that much for me- but that's the beauty of it. for the past 30 years i've been doing things with a minimum of expensive equipment. i have a bender or two, some hammers and dollys, a smoke wrench (oxy/ace), stick welder (which i use for all metals- inclusing stainless and aluminum), and a mig (for small work and sheet). wide and guys like relic have better equipped shops than i, and can be of help on the more technical things. but for sticking metal together, i might pitch in......

j

Wide
12-12-2005, 07:04 PM
O hell dont me me sound like I know what I'm doing, I just fake it :D

softail
12-12-2005, 07:07 PM
Cool deal Wide.
I have been in the metal trades up to about 8 years back. I now own and operate a Marble and Granite fabrication company. We happen to have the largest counter top 3 axis CNC on the west coast. 13'x8' working surface. See photo. This machine has the ability to do full on three dimensional carving, but the 35K for the software has not been a priority for us because we have no need in our industry.
In regards to the metal experience. I was a Commercial diver for 8 years, and welding and burning (Both topside and under water) is what got me started in the metal trades.
My post diving experience in the metal trades included custom furniture, chandeliers, and custom one off light fixtures. (If you have ever been into a Nordstroms you would have seen the type of lights we made. That industry required light metal fabrication of Brass, Bronze, S steel, Mild carbon, Aluminum, and even some gold. Tig, mig and silver solder were the main ways of welding. We had to design our own tools when we couldn't buy them. We used tools for reasons other than their original intent, and were basically required to be able to problem solve/ think outside of the box in order to get the job done.
I left this industry to pursue being a shop mechanic in the Boiler Makers Union. In this trade I was required to be ASME (X RAY Inspected) certified
in all positions Wire feed and stick welding. The layout skills required the use of Trigonometry for spherical and conical shapes, and for tangential penetrations through large boilers/pressure vessels. the type of equipment that we used was large industrial sheers, rolls, and breaks. This industry was somewhat more straight forward than the previous, but still required some ability to come up with custom tools to assist in the day to day new problem.
The metal trades were the most rewarding thing I had ever done in my life. That is, until the Union took a big ole crap on me. This was the point that I got started in the stone business.
I look forward to helping with this thread that you have started, and hopefully I can give assistance to the people that come here with questions. B)

junior
12-12-2005, 07:22 PM
GREAT! can't believe how much talent there is out there in this group...i truly look forward to your contributions, 05....i'm no expert by any means, i've just been stumbling through it a while....

j

hefitz04wg
12-12-2005, 07:38 PM
I know there's a vast difference in trains and motorcycles. But I,ve been in the metal trades, welding fitting and fabrication since I got out of the military in the late 70's. Have been an AWS Certified Welding Inspector since 1986. All that a couple of buck might get me a cup of joe in a few places (Starbucks excluded).

But I may chime in from time to time. I love working with metal and wish I had the facilities and equipment to practice my trade on my own.

Maybe when I grow up.

Wide
12-12-2005, 07:53 PM
Cool hefitz04wg

Metal is metal

The more opinions the better we are :D

Wide
12-12-2005, 07:57 PM
softailo5, Holy Crap

Is that a tool changer with 30 tools?

Cool stuff ;)

dannytheman
12-12-2005, 08:26 PM
Does this mean I have to buy more stuff for the garage??

Happy to see this added, now fabricate me some shit@!!!

:lol: :lol: :lol:

softail
12-12-2005, 09:22 PM
softailo5, Holy Crap

Is that a tool changer with 30 tools?

Cool stuff ;)

32 ;)

Hellswraith
12-13-2005, 11:42 AM
Master Manipulator of Molten Metal !! B)

Thats what I used to call myself when I was welding ..But I got a crazy idea to get into the world of electronics a few years back and havent looked back since . My office hands are no match for such manly work anymore . Used to love waking up blowing lbs of black shit outta the nose every morning too .

But I've had many jobs welding and it was the first trade I ever learned when I joined the Navy after HIGHschool . :lol: Little did I know Hull Maintenance Technician meant - some dumbass welding in a boiler room or catapult all hours of the day and night .

One welding technique that always intrigued me was Tig welding . I can do it but I never got it to the point that I was really comfortable with it . I never really got to do it much though and most of the welding I did was Mig or Stick . Anywho , kewl new forum . I'll check it out and see whats talking ...

King
12-15-2005, 06:44 PM
I took a blacksmithing class for two semesters and learned how to forge weld. We started by making all of our own tools out of old coil springs. Hot hard dirty work.... loved it. Not very practical though. Be pretty tough to forge weld a tab on a frame.

arthureld
12-15-2005, 06:59 PM
Wow, about time I noticed this thread.
I'm a NC programmer and teach CATIA NC Programming (http://www.elcamino.edu/Faculty/rbombassei/) online.
And I've been working with machining since the 70's.
I should be able to answer anyones CNC questions.

junior
12-15-2005, 07:04 PM
so THAT's what you do....was wondering what brought you all over the country like you do....

j

arthureld
12-15-2005, 07:10 PM
so THAT's what you do....was wondering what brought you all over the country like you do....

j

Yep, I'm contract programming for Boeing right now. Most of the guys I work with bounce around the country and we run into each other in all of the big industrial cities. Many work overseas from time to time as well. I haven't takin an overseas contract yet, but have been watching for a good one.

junior
12-15-2005, 08:59 PM
i worked overseas in hotel construction/management. for single guys, there are some fun places to be.

or so the guys i worked with tell me.......lol

j

arthureld
12-15-2005, 09:11 PM
i worked overseas in hotel construction/management. for single guys, there are some fun places to be.

or so the guys i worked with tell me.......lol

j

http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/mesg/emoticons/04.gif

thorsblood
12-16-2005, 11:43 AM
I got torches and a basic lincoln 110 wire feed welder in the garage. I love playin with that stuff. I have never been able to get good success with aluminum wire though. I have really wanted to experiment with some treestand construction as well as some trailer work, using aluminum plate, but the wire welder just ain't cuttin it. Its great for steel, and I can stick stuff together efficiently, but I guess I need to go another route with the aluminum. I can use a stick welder too and my brothers got one I use for heavy stuff. Took welding, and metal shop all through high school. I used to love working in the foundry making molds and pouring aluminum, brass etc. But, that was 25 years ago, and life took me down other paths. I have looked at some of the aluminum cast parts off these HD's and thought it would be fun to pour some of my own stuff, but time, equipment and all that shit gets in the way. Mostly time. Well retirement looms. Maybe someday.

Kagan
12-16-2005, 12:01 PM
I've become pretty good at metalwork too. I can pop a beer can tab like a pro! :D

junior
12-16-2005, 01:13 PM
thor-

if welding aluminum, you have to chnage the tank from the standard 75/25 argon/co2 to a straight argon. also, the gun and shetah need to be free of any ferrous residue. a lot of shops will have one setup for steel only, and another for aluminum only.....

j

Wide
12-16-2005, 02:38 PM
You can also try pre heating the alum some, makes a better weld for the less powerfull welders. Remember alum dissipates heat real fast :D

Atch
12-16-2005, 03:03 PM
I've been a Machinist for around 25 years....mostly doing Lathe work. Working at a Govt. installation making recoil parts for howitzers. Ran a Turret Lathe for quite a while, and then went to CNC. We use G-code (274) programming. Have a few machines using BCL (binary cutter location) programming. We cut steel, stainless steel, bronze, and aluminum. I'm pretty good at figuring feeds and speeds, but the downside is I almost have to be there to watch and listen......you can tell by the looks and sound whether or not your tooling is "happy"!!!!!

Wide
12-16-2005, 03:29 PM
.you can tell by the looks and sound whether or not your tooling is "happy"!!!!!

Not even gonna go there :lol: :lol: :lol:

Awsome man, we sure do have some folk here :D

junior
12-16-2005, 04:58 PM
You can also try pre heating the alum some, makes a better weld for the less powerfull welders. Remember alum dissipates heat real fast :D

absolutely...i stick weld aluminum and preheating is a must.....

j

CoolMaker
12-17-2005, 12:06 AM
Wide wrote:
You can also try pre heating the alum some, makes a better weld for the less powerfull welders. Remember alum dissipates heat real fast


I Tig weld alum and heating it can help at times.

Mellisa
12-17-2005, 12:10 AM
Man, this thread's gonna be a real chick magnet! :lol:
I was drawn to this thread....I don't know what it was. Maybe some kind of magnetic pull? :P
Question: Do any of you run your welding equipment on solar only? When Dave and I build our shop in the mountains, we're going to try to be off grid as much as possible. The solar people tell us he can run all of his welding equipment off their solar.
As much as I trust salesmen *spits* I'd prefer to hear some real world experiences with this.

Wide
12-17-2005, 12:17 AM
When Dave and I build our shop in the mountains, we're going to try to be off grid as much as possible. The solar people tell us he can run all of his welding equipment off their solar.

Tell you if they think that your going to need an couple acres of grid unles syou have a great storage supply. HHmm depends on the welder & amount of welding.

Very very cool idea, I really like that & wind, heck do both & sell back to the electric co ;)

CoolMaker
12-17-2005, 12:18 AM
Just a bigger set of battery banks.....

BeatnikCustom
10-01-2006, 03:27 AM
Howdy folks,
This is my first post in this forum. I run a shop in Tennessee. We do custom work and have a production softTail. If there are any questions about metal working, I'd say this room is full of answers. I guess I'm just one more opinion if you need one.

Wide
10-01-2006, 06:24 AM
Nice to have you Beatnick

Yes were full of something for sure :lol: :lol:


1beer

BeatnikCustom
10-01-2006, 02:15 PM
Thanks Wide.
I guess I need to look at the post date on some of these threads......Wow. I kind of missed the boat. Thanks again for replying.

Wide
10-01-2006, 05:28 PM
Dont sweat the post date, we leave everything open all the time, never know :D

Mellisa
10-01-2006, 10:04 PM
I should clarify: We will still be hooked up to PG&E for electricity. We will just 'bank' power throughout the day. The solar companies assure me we will have a very small electric bill, if any.
Our system will be big enough to power all of our needs on a normal day, with a small battery backup for power outages. Our hope is to save around $300 a month.
A man here has solar and he runs a welding business out of his home. He has so much power banked with the power company, he lets all of his neighbors run extension cords to his house at Christmas time to run the lights in their yards. I want his system.

fxrglide91
12-23-2009, 09:34 PM
I think I'm at the right thread. But here it goes. Santa has just authorized a welder. Looking for recomendations.
MY NEEDS
1. Plug in to 120V 30 amp
2. 1/8 " steel
3. Harry Home Owner type welding
4. MIG wire feed
5. $200-$300 range

Leaning towards Home Depot Lincoln welder.

junior
12-23-2009, 09:43 PM
the small lincolns at hd are ok for the here and there, but for $500 you could get a nicer hobart or miller 140 that has a higher duty cycle.

i don't know how much/often you plan on using it, but the less expensive models have about a 70% duty cycle at mid setting. that equates to a lot of rest time between welds...

j

fxrglide91
12-24-2009, 03:05 AM
Just ordered a hobart 125

junior
12-24-2009, 04:12 AM
great! by your budget i assume the 125ez. that's a good flux core machine....

j