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Wide
12-14-2005, 07:50 PM
"The consequences of the flaw are severe," Felten wrote. "It allows any web page you visit to download, install, and run any code it likes on your computer. Any web page can seize control of your computer; then it can do anything it likes. That’s about as serious as a security flaw can get."


Microsoft fixes five flaws
Published: 2005-12-13


Microsoft released two patches on Tuesday, a cumulative update for Internet Explorer that fixes four flaws and a fix for a kernel-based privilege-escalation vulnerability.

The update to Internet Explorer fixes a previously known flaw that was recently exploited. The flaw, originally found in May and classified as a crash bug, was thought to be safe from exploitation.

The cumulative update to Internet Explorer also disables the ActiveX control marked safe for scripting by the uninstaller for Sony's controversial copy protection measures. The uninstaller left behind the ActiveX control and created a vulnerability that could be exploited by a malicious Web site.

As the last scheduled patches for this year, the two patches bring the software giant's total security updates to 55 in 2005, ten more than in 2004.




http://www.microsoft.com/technet/security/bulletin/ms05-054.mspx

OldSalt
12-14-2005, 08:09 PM
Thanks Wide! :o

resection3d
12-15-2005, 02:18 AM
Thanks Wide. Your explanation of the problem is better than Microsoft's ever thought about being.

Any idea if Mozilla Firefox is affected?

58PanMan
12-15-2005, 02:38 AM
Firefox is unaffected and still safe.
I highly recommend it for your browser and Thunderbird for your email.
Both are free and safe.

Mellisa
12-15-2005, 03:04 AM
Thank you Wide! I downloaded the update and signed up for future notifications.
I remember years ago when a virus was going around through email boxes. I got it and called my internet provider, who gave me a free site on the net that got rid of it and protected me from future attacks.
I printed up a notice about it and put tear-off tabs on the bottom with the web address. I posted the notice at work(church). No one took a tab off the notice and the people I told about it looked at me like I was insane. I had all of these people's addresses in my mailbox so I knew they were all going to get the virus, if they didn't already have it.
Within a week everyone had the virus on their home and work computers. They all paniced, demanding to know what to do. Most called computer repair services, who gladly took their business.
I just sat back and watched it all. The notice was printed on bright paper, posted in several locations. I even told people who were affected where to get the information to clean up their computers. No one listened. It cost them a lot of money to get rid of the virus.
I hope a lot of people use this information and protect themselves. Sometimes the simplest thing is the hardest thing to do.

Wide
12-15-2005, 03:24 AM
Just remember, Use Mozilla Firefox. It will not execute code against the operating system.

Internet Explorer & a few other things by microsoft are faulty by design & can not be fixed so it's like a dog chasing it's tail to keep up

Like PanMan said, use Firefox with Thunderbird email, you'll be in a much better place.

Also you can to this site & download & run their 3 programs to disable all the crap you dont really need, I think they call them the Three Musketeers
http://www.grc.com/default.htm



The DCOMbobulator 1,268,726 downloads.
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Shoot The Messenger 1,541,842 downloads.
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UnPlug n' Pray 2,341,640 downloads
As originally urged by the FBI, and still urged by prominent security experts, our UnPnP utility easily disables the dangerous, and almost always unnecessary, Universal Plug and Play service. If you don't need it, turn it off. (For ALL versions of Windows.)

12-15-2005, 03:36 AM
Just remember, Use Mozilla Firefox. It will not execute code against the operating system.

Internet Explorer & a few other things by microsoft are faulty by design & can not be fixed so it's like a dog chasing it's tail to keep up

BOSTON - The fallout from a hidden copy-protection program that Sony BMG Music Entertainment put on some CDs is only getting worse. Sony’s suggested method for removing the program actually widens the security hole the original software created, researchers say.

Sony apparently has moved to recall the discs in question, but music fans who have listened to them on their computers or tried to remove the dangerous software they deposited could still be vulnerable.

“This is a surprisingly bad design from a security standpoint,” said Ed Felten, a Princeton University computer science professor who explored the removal program with a graduate student, J. Alex Halderman. “It endangers users in several ways.”

The “XCP” copy-protection program was included on at least 20 CDs, including releases by Van Zant, The Bad Plus, Neil Diamond and Celine Dion.

When the discs were put into a PC — a necessary step for transferring music to iPods and other portable music players — the CD automatically installed a program that restricted how many times the discs’ tracks could be copied, and made it extremely inconvenient to transfer songs into the format used by iPods.

That antipiracy software — which works only on Windows PCs — came with a cloaking feature that allowed it to hide files on users’ computers. Security researchers classified the program as “spyware,” saying it secretly transmits details about what music the PC is playing. Manual attempts to remove the software can disable the PC’s CD drive.

The program also gave virus writers an easy tool for hiding their malicious software. Last week, virus-like “Trojan horse” programs emerged that took advantage of the cloaking feature to enter computers undetected, antivirus companies said. Trojans are typically used to steal personal information, launch attacks on other computers and send spam.

Stung by the controversy, Sony BMG and the company that developed the antipiracy software, First 4 Internet Ltd. of Oxfordshire, United Kingdom, released a program that uninstalls XCP.

But the uninstaller has created a new set of problems.

To get the uninstall program, users have to request it by filling out online forms. Once submitted, the forms themselves download and install a program designed to ready the PC for the fix. Essentially, it makes the PC open to downloading and installing code from the Internet.

According to the Princeton analysis, the program fails to make the computer confirm that such code should come only from Sony or First 4 Internet.

“The consequences of the flaw are severe,” Felten and Halderman wrote in a blog posting Tuesday. “It allows any Web page you visit to download, install, and run any code it likes on your computer. Any Web page can seize control of your computer; then it can do anything it likes. That’s about as serious as a security flaw can get.”

Sony BMG spokesman John McKay did not return calls seeking comment. First 4 Internet was not making any comment, according to Lynette Riley, the office manager who answered the company’s phone Tuesday evening in England.

What drag. My Mac OS X computer doesn't have any of these cool exploits. It just works! :P