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Shorty
05-06-2006, 05:14 PM
Ok, yall knew this was bound to happen right? hehe

It seams my stove burners are not large enough for my skillet. So over the past few weeks of using the pantina is developing in a circle in the middle of the pan, exactly where the burner is under it. Is my only choice to get a smaller pan? I have tried to heat it up slower to spread the head more evenly but that hasnt helped. Any ideas?

HDangel
05-06-2006, 05:21 PM
first 2 things that come to mind is did you season it correctly? and wha'cha cooking in it? my mom always said to never do tomato based things in them, and watch what kind of oils/grease you use in them. some will deteriorate the seasoning. that could cause it?

Shorty
05-06-2006, 05:25 PM
Well HD hehe, this particular one comes preseasoned from the factory! :huh: hehehe
I dont cook anything tomato in it but thanx for reminding me cos I was contemplating spaghetti tonight. I use a solid shortening for reseasoning it. I think thats what HeadDoc recommended instead of a spray.
You can just see a large dark circle in the middle the same size as the burner underneath, and if anything sticks at all towards the outside of that circle.
I should take a pic.

Wide
05-06-2006, 05:26 PM
Boil some oil in it & let it cool down or do soem deep fat frying in it. That will get er fixed.


Dont wash it with any soap, I just get them really hot & flush it out with water & a scoring pad :D

HDangel
05-06-2006, 05:27 PM
yep and no acidic foods
sorry i never used one already seasoned

Shorty
05-06-2006, 05:38 PM
Alrightie then. Fried chicken and french fries for dinner tonight. Thanx Wide. :D

Wide
05-06-2006, 05:50 PM
Yummy

wreckerman
05-06-2006, 09:30 PM
wide is right on target , the only thing i would add is when wipeing them out i use a cheese cloth with some table salt folded in the center of it for cleening the pan and keeping it well seasoned

Jamorris
05-07-2006, 08:44 AM
Mine are black. I never really clean them. I knock off most of the old food, taking care not to nick the seasoning. When they are a s clean as I figure they need to be, I heat them up to burn off any remaining water and wet them down with olive oil. When cooled, I wipe off any excess.

If it is something like one of my dutch ovens, I put a paper towel in and let it hold the lid off a perfect seal.

I get agitated when the inevitable happens, but really, all you need to do is burn off the seasoning and redo it.

Jerry

nascardriver
06-06-2006, 04:20 PM
You can also use a heat diverter, spreads the flame out more evenly , you can usually get em at any hardware or cooking store..... :D

Buster
06-07-2006, 02:54 AM
You actually use them to cook in?? :o

The wife just uses hers to threaten me with. :P


Actually, she cooks a mean pan of cornbread in it.

mojophone
08-06-2006, 06:16 PM
Ok, yall knew this was bound to happen right? hehe

It seams my stove burners are not large enough for my skillet. So over the past few weeks of using the pantina is developing in a circle in the middle of the pan, exactly where the burner is under it. Is my only choice to get a smaller pan? I have tried to heat it up slower to spread the head more evenly but that hasnt helped. Any ideas?
My question is Are you using gas or electric burners. I know when I use gas burners I don't have that problem but electric burners do it to my pans every time.

Jamorris
08-06-2006, 10:45 PM
Ok, yall knew this was bound to happen right? hehe

It seams my stove burners are not large enough for my skillet. So over the past few weeks of using the pantina is developing in a circle in the middle of the pan, exactly where the burner is under it. Is my only choice to get a smaller pan? I have tried to heat it up slower to spread the head more evenly but that hasnt helped. Any ideas?
My question is Are you using gas or electric burners. I know when I use gas burners I don't have that problem but electric burners do it to my pans every time.

I am reading this to mean the unseasoned iron is only seasoning in the middle. You season the skillet in the oven. Coat it with a suitable grease/oil and bake it at 300 degrees.

The apparent method it seems you are using will tke forever to season the entire skillet.

If I misread and you are burning off the seasoning, you are cooking too hot.

Jerry

Shorty
08-07-2006, 05:18 PM
The pan came preseasoned from the factory, its a Lodge Logic... http://www.lodgemfg.com/
Instructions said to wash it with water, no soap, then dry and coat with oil and thats it. After awhile I started noticing that the real black patina that develops from continuous use and seasoning was occuring only in the middle of the pan, the same size as my electric burner. Food started sticking all around the edges where the heat wasnt reaching. I have put it in the oven a few times and that does work but I cant heat up a 5. cf oven each time I want to season the pan. Right now my cast iron cooking is on hold until I find one of those heat diffusing plates and then Ill try again. :D

L_T_S
08-07-2006, 05:33 PM
Maybe the way I do it is goofy but I got tried of cleaning up the splatter mess.
I heat the oven (seeing how it is self cleaning) then heat the pan on the burner.
Throw what ever I am going to cook in the pan and then throw it in the oven.
Never sticks and cooks evenly and I do not have to clean the grease splatter mess.
But becareful when you take the pan out because it sure is hot.

Jamorris
08-07-2006, 06:47 PM
The pan came preseasoned from the factory, its a Lodge Logic... http://www.lodgemfg.com/
Instructions said to wash it with water, no soap, then dry and coat with oil and thats it. After awhile I started noticing that the real black patina that develops from continuous use and seasoning was occuring only in the middle of the pan, the same size as my electric burner. Food started sticking all around the edges where the heat wasnt reaching. I have put it in the oven a few times and that does work but I cant heat up a 5. cf oven each time I want to season the pan. Right now my cast iron cooking is on hold until I find one of those heat diffusing plates and then Ill try again. :D

The darker patina will come. Just do the minimal cleaning routine and give the iron a light coat of grease/oil after every use. The darker patina is simply a build up pf carbon. You are likely just cleaning it TOO well. Under use and over cleaning are the two big abuses of cast iron.

Now, an obvious question. Are there ANY other problem areas? Is food sticking? Is it tasting bad? Even when I burn food, it peels right out of my cast iron. At most, a light scrape with a wood, or other soft scraper is all I need and no harm done.

Jerry

mojophone
08-08-2006, 09:52 PM
Shorty the problem isn't with your pan at all. The problem is you are trying to use an electric coil to do your heating. Cast Iron cookware is not meant for electric stovetops. They were made for open flame or oven heating. btw I deplore electric cooking anything because they just destroy a pan unless they have one of those electric burner with that convection crap on top, nope don't really like those either just give me some gas or wood and I am a happy cooker.

LittleSisterWA
08-09-2006, 06:55 AM
I have been cooking with cast iron skillets for more years that I care to remember. I have cooked everything in them..even tomatoes. I have used them on campfires (wicked open flame), propsane camp stoves, gas heat, and electric burners.

The key is exactly what you were told to do with the oven trick. Pre-treated don't mean schmuck. That's kinda like pre-washed denims. It's cast iron. Unless you're stir frying, lower the heat. Cast iron will transfuse (spread) the heat out to the outer edges. Also, if you can, always try to fit the bottom of your pan (any pan) to the size of your burner. That helps too. When done cooking rinse out with water--no soap. For a while you may have to use a srubby or flipper to scrape the harder to remove food particles but that shouldn't last too long. Set it on the still warm burner to get the rest of the moisture out, then swipe the inside bottom & sides with some oil. My folks always used the liquid vegetable oil so I don't think what kind of cooking oil matters just so long as you grease that puppy back up again. Camping--use sand by the river...swipe w/some oil and store it.

And thanks for the oven instructions! My good one got overheated--a good re-seasoning will fix her straight up! :D

troublingbratt
10-03-2006, 10:31 AM
hmmmmm...preseasoned :huh: never heard such a thing ... anyway my mom always said to season an iron skillet with lard in a 250 degree oven for like 4 hrs or so ... and as for usin soap .. i always did and never ever put oil on it just make sure about every 5000 miles or so you may need to reseason in the oven but i never did have to


i love cookin in iron skillets ..so versitile :D in the oven ,on the stove,or on a camp fire it stays tried and true ;)

Jamorris
10-03-2006, 11:41 AM
hmmmmm...preseasoned :huh: never heard such a thing ... anyway my mom always said to season an iron skillet with lard in a 250 degree oven for like 4 hrs or so ... and as for usin soap .. i always did and never ever put oil on it just make sure about every 5000 miles or so you may need to reseason in the oven but i never did have to


Sacriledge!!!! Soap on Cast Iron, why on earth would you do such a thing? Try not using it and see what happens. You surely will not get the runs! :lol: Cast Iron is porous. That soap gets in there and iis dam hard to get out. You must be used to the taste?

Mine never sees more that hot water and very mild scrubbbing. The darker my iron gets, the better I like it. Nothing sticks to it.

Jerry

Lowryder
10-04-2006, 01:22 AM
Isnt using soap on a cast iron grounds for a divorce? I wouldnt even let the last gal that lived with me to use them.

troublingbratt
10-04-2006, 10:28 AM
been doin it since i was a kid .. NEVER ever had any problem

Shorty
10-04-2006, 03:22 PM
Ok, I gotta admit, this iron skillet shit aint all its cracked up to be hehe. My biggest problems are still that the pan heats up mainly in the middle and everything towards the outside and sides sticks. I also dont get how youre supposed to not taste onions in your french toast when youre not washing it with soap. Seasoning it in the oven was working great but thats too much elect to heat it up like that everyday.
I still use it, on a daily basis, but the things Im doing to get it to work would make you guys cringe...and in some cases divorce me hehehhe. ;)

D.N.F.
10-04-2006, 03:52 PM
Soap ain't gonna wreck cast iron.

I only use salt to clean my dungarees...

If it is dirty and a pain to clean use soap and scrub it with a scrubby thing. Just know that you will have to quickly re-season it with some oil which can be done on top of the stove, just heat until you see the slightest bit of smoke, and only use a fine film of oil. Only oil the inside right.... ;)

Salt is a quick clean for stuff that doesn't dirty the crap out of your pan.

Shorty
10-04-2006, 04:01 PM
hehe dungarees are heavy duty pants...not pans. :P

D.N.F.
10-04-2006, 04:02 PM
I thought dungarees were something you wore while you were in a medieval prison.

I only use salt to wipe my bum.

Jamorris
10-04-2006, 05:53 PM
Some things are done, because it has been found to be the right way to do it. Sorta like changing oil in yer Harley. Yes, D.N.F, you do want to oil the outside of your cast iron. You won't see rust anywhere on my cast iron, My wife has her own skillet, and it has a red, rusty bottom. On a really well maintained cast iron, the seasoning has worked clean through the metal and outside oiling can be lessened, unless burned off.

Shorty, use a trick from camp dutch oven users. Move the skillet around on that fancy new-fangled heat source. Cast iron needs a large heat source to evenly heat up. It does not need to be extremely hot, just large.

Jerry

Shorty
10-04-2006, 05:55 PM
Jamorris....you and your wife have seperate frying pans?? :lol:

Jamorris
10-04-2006, 06:02 PM
She ain't allowed to clean mine. She can use it, unless she burns it. After that, she is not allowed. I will not use crappy cast iron to cook with. She had two skillet, when we got together. I bought my own. We have an understanding.

Jerry

D.N.F.
10-04-2006, 06:12 PM
I never oil the outside when I am doing quicky seasonings cause it causes a freak ing smokeshow when you heat it up. I have no rust on mine cause I dry them. Rust needs moisture right?


dnf, no '.' please, complicates the matter entirely don't you think?


Hell it is a big slab of iron, do what you want with it, you are not going to wreck it.

^_^

HeadDoc
10-04-2006, 07:15 PM
i'm in the no soap ever group...only qualified dutch oveneers ever get close to mine. Shorty get one of those trivets and lift the oven off the burner ..that should solve your problem. don't give up cast iron can cook like no other pot or pan. mine never sticks

Jamorris
10-04-2006, 10:22 PM
[quote="


Hell it is a big slab of iron, do what you want with it, you are not going to wreck it.

^_^[/quote]

Once cast iron is ruined, it is done. You'd be surprised how many people will melt lead and other things not healthy in a pot, and then cook in it. It is all downhill from there. Cast Iron Cooking is an art form. Nothing but pure food product goes into my cast iron.

Hint: Cast Iron has pores. It holds contaminents. Soap is not food.


But, I guess, if I have to explain it to you, you won't understand. It is sort of like the difference between Harley's and other bikes.


Jerry

Shorty
10-04-2006, 10:56 PM
Wow, this is amazing to see folks be so passionate about something. Jamorris, do you ever enter any cast iron cooking contests? Out here they have mock pioneer camps and dutch oven contests. It truly is an art. So much fun to watch and even better to eat.
Also, do you any of you have any cast iron specific cookbooks? I have 'Cooking in Cast Iron' by Mara Rogers....alot of nowadays recipes and gourmet stuff you wouldnt think of cooking in cast. And this one is my favorite, its called 'A Taste for War' by William Daviss Its a culinary history of the Blue and Grey during the Civil war. The first half is history, the second half is all the old recipes. Foods with names we've only heard of. I love it.

Jamorris
10-05-2006, 01:31 AM
Shorty:

I do not compete. But, I do strive towards excellence in my cast iron cooking. Yes I have several books, mostly recipes. Although, it seems my best efforts come off the cuff. It is generally, "what would happen if I put this in?".


Jerry

D.N.F.
10-05-2006, 03:35 PM
[quote="


Hell it is a big slab of iron, do what you want with it, you are not going to wreck it.

^_^

Once cast iron is ruined, it is done. You'd be surprised how many people will melt lead and other things not healthy in a pot, and then cook in it. It is all downhill from there. Cast Iron Cooking is an art form. Nothing but pure food product goes into my cast iron.

Hint: Cast Iron has pores. It holds contaminents. Soap is not food.


But, I guess, if I have to explain it to you, you won't understand. It is sort of like the difference between Harley's and other bikes.


Jerry[/quote]

I guess the point I was trying to get across is that you can still enjoy cast iron without being a fanatic about it. Yes you know way more about it than I do, however I can enjoy my stick free cast iron with the occasional soaping. I can also enjoy my RK with or without the occasional washing. I am guessing that 99% of cast iron pan owners regularly wash their pans with soap and water or even in the dish washer. I can also guess they have not rusted away and are still serviceable. Should they do this... probably not. Do they care.... probably not.

Look we could have the same arguement about making coffee or the proper way to use an espresso machine (p.s.i. of tamping the coffee). In the greater scheme of things 'who really gives a rats ass'? If it works for you use it. I thought Shorty was asking for a few opinions so I gave mine. Shorty has the intelligence to pick through the garbage to find out what she does or does not need. Obviously I am an ignorant punter concerning cast iron cookware.

Shepherd
10-05-2006, 03:59 PM
..........after raiding my mothers house a few months ago, I found my father cast iron skillets I remember him cooking on when I was a kid. 3 of em from about 14", down to 8".
I'm pretty sure they're about 60 yrs old at this point......
boiling oil and heat treat oven here I come :D

Shorty
10-05-2006, 05:52 PM
Nice find Shep!

Jamorris
10-06-2006, 12:14 AM
I guess the point I was trying to get across is that you can still enjoy cast iron without being a fanatic about it. Yes you know way more about it than I do, however I can enjoy my stick free cast iron with the occasional soaping. I can also enjoy my RK with or without the occasional washing. I am guessing that 99% of cast iron pan owners regularly wash their pans with soap and water or even in the dish washer. I can also guess they have not rusted away and are still serviceable. Should they do this... probably not. Do they care.... probably not.

Look we could have the same arguement about making coffee or the proper way to use an espresso machine (p.s.i. of tamping the coffee). In the greater scheme of things 'who really gives a rats ass'? If it works for you use it. I thought Shorty was asking for a few opinions so I gave mine. Shorty has the intelligence to pick through the garbage to find out what she does or does not need. Obviously I am an ignorant punter concerning cast iron cookware.

Chill out! :lol: You were telling what you can get away with. I was telling what has been perceived as "*The Right Way*. We can and should argue about it. And I can taste the soap. Gotta git that last nag in there.

I have fun arguing technique. You ought to see me at the range. Us shooters are very technical. But, bottomline, if the bullet hits what you were aiming at, when it needed to be hit, the job was done properly. The primary sin is a bullet loosed unintentionally.

Jerry

HockeynHarleys
11-25-2006, 08:26 AM
If you wash them out, the only way to dry them is to put them back on the heat. Then after the heat dry oil them while they are still hot. Heating removes all moisture from the pores and oiling makes them so nice.... But then I only have one skillet and a dutch oven. I cook all kinds of stuff in them.
Later,
Hockey

Jamorris
11-25-2006, 03:22 PM
I have two camp Dutch Ovens, three skillets, one griddle and one pizza pan. The griddle is great for making grilled items for two. Pizza pan make terrific pizza and is very useful for breads..

I am wanting a Dutch Oven for use inside the kitchen stove. I think one of those will do.

Jerry

Shorty
11-25-2006, 05:12 PM
I have two camp Dutch Ovens, three skillets, one griddle and one pizza pan. The griddle is great for making grilled items for two. Pizza pan make terrific pizza and is very useful for breads..

I am wanting a Dutch Oven for use inside the kitchen stove. I think one of those will do.

JerryIm going for another one today so the first one must not be all that bad hehe. I want a small frying pan for when I just cook for myself. I didnt know they made pizza pans but when Im at the store today I will check them out!

Jamorris
11-25-2006, 05:39 PM
I have two camp Dutch Ovens, three skillets, one griddle and one pizza pan. The griddle is great for making grilled items for two. Pizza pan make terrific pizza and is very useful for breads..

I am wanting a Dutch Oven for use inside the kitchen stove. I think one of those will do.

JerryIm going for another one today so the first one must not be all that bad hehe. I want a small frying pan for when I just cook for myself. I didnt know they made pizza pans but when Im at the store today I will check them out!

Lodge makes them

Jerry

Shorty
12-12-2006, 12:31 AM
I did it. I got a smaller Lodge Logic pan and I love it! I think its fast becoming my favorite kitchen item. It heats up fast, and evenly, and its the perfect size for anything quick.
Toasty cheese sandwiches have never tasted so good!
Not sure what my next piece of cast iron will be. Theres not much of a variety in our local store so Ill have to check around the internet.

Edit: Just checked ebay for Lodge Logic......SCORE!! :D

Jamorris
12-12-2006, 01:10 AM
I did it. I got a smaller Lodge Logic pan and I love it! I think its fast becoming my favorite kitchen item. It heats up fast, and evenly, and its the perfect size for anything quick.
Toasty cheese sandwiches have never tasted so good!
Not sure what my next piece of cast iron will be. Theres not much of a variety in our local store so Ill have to check around the internet.

Edit: Just checked ebay for Lodge Logic......SCORE!! :D

Try the griddle that fits over two burners. Then you'll know real grilled cheese!!! . One side is rippled for bacon and such. But, I rarely use that side. 8)

Hint: cook the sandwiches over the burners and move to cooler area for a short while while the next ones start cooking. It keeps them warm and everyone cvane start eating at the same time, if you have a crowd.



Jerry

Slice
12-12-2006, 02:35 AM
here is another curing method I've read many good things about:

If you're willing to put up with the smoke what I've found works well is this:

Wash and dry the iron thoroughly. Warm the metal but not so hot you can't hold it in your hand. Coat it evenly with a layer of whatever you're going to season it with, the more saturated the fat the better. Lard works well. Put the metal upside down in your oven so that any fat that runs off won't pool on the actual cooking surfaces. Turn the oven to 450-500 degrees and close the door. Bake the iron for about two hours then turn the oven off but do not open the door. Allow to cool to room temperature before removing the iron. If you've used a light cooking oil you may need to bake for three hours.

You'll get a fair amount of smoke while all of this is going on so do it when you are able to have the windows open. I'd also line the bottom of the oven with aluminum foil so that any fat that drips off won't burn to the bottom of your oven.

You should end up with an even, smooth, non-sticky seasoning. For brand new never before seasoned iron you may have to do it twice, but usually once is enough.

The seasoning on any cast iron will need to be touched up once in a while unless you do a lot of frying which will do it for you as part of the cooking process.

Shorty
12-12-2006, 04:40 AM
Jamorris.....a cast iron griddle. Oooo I can smell the flapjacks already!

Slice, how often do you do that? It works well for me to do my large pan like that but Ive never tried it upside down. I also dont think I cant afford to heat up a 5.0 cubic ft oven for a few hours everytime I need a pan seasoned.

Jamorris
12-12-2006, 11:38 AM
Slice, how often do you do that? It works well for me to do my large pan like that but Ive never tried it upside down. I also dont think I cant afford to heat up a 5.0 cubic ft oven for a few hours everytime I need a pan seasoned.


Shorty, unless you burn the seasoning off, it only needs done once.

Jerry

Shorty
12-12-2006, 03:42 PM
Shorty, unless you burn the seasoning off, it only needs done once.

JerryWell hehehe, yeah, I did that I think. My big pan got too hot one day and the black started coming off the sides. Ive really gotten the hang of it since then so food hasnt been sticking which means I havent had to scrub like before which means my seasoning is hanging in there...so far!
I have found that one huge trick is to wash the pan right away, while its still hot. Thats something my mind isnt used to since Ive grown up with pans that will warp if you put them under water while hot.
Im learning! :D

Jamorris
12-12-2006, 09:44 PM
Shorty, unless you burn the seasoning off, it only needs done once.

JerryWell hehehe, yeah, I did that I think. My big pan got too hot one day and the black started coming off the sides. Ive really gotten the hang of it since then so food hasnt been sticking which means I havent had to scrub like before which means my seasoning is hanging in there...so far!
I have found that one huge trick is to wash the pan right away, while its still hot. Thats something my mind isnt used to since Ive grown up with pans that will warp if you put them under water while hot.
Im learning! :D

Careful, cast iron will crack if put under, or in water while hot. I hope you meant warm to almost hot. Use clean, clear, soap free water about the saame temp as the cast iron.

Jerry

Shorty
12-12-2006, 10:16 PM
Hmm, well I dont put it under cold water when Ive been frying using oil. But yeah, Ive just been taking it from the stove and going under the water with it, which is usually tepid, and wash it up. Then I dry it, put it back on the burner which is off but still warm, spray it with Pam and let it hang out till it cools.
I didnt know this stuff could crack. That would scare the shit outta me! hehe