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View Full Version : NAME YOUR ROAD HAZARD



Drebbin
12-31-2004, 08:18 PM
I thought we could use this thread to identify road hazards and provide suggestions for dealing with them. I'll start with one of my favorites:

STEEL PLATES:

You know the kind that are used to cover holes in the road/street?

I often commute to work in our nation's capital - yeah, that well maintained DC !!! Well, those plates are everywhere. Here's a few things I see:

1. They are not always fitted properly - this can provide a real rut to get a tire caught in - not to mention perhaps a real deep hole. So IF traffic allows, I try to go around them. No such luck usually.

2. These plates can be VERY slippery. Much the same way we handle ice, I ty NOT to do any inputs like braking, accelerating or steering - JUST GET THRU IT -- IF I can't get around it.

What road hazard have you found & what method have you used for proficiently dealing with it ?

DREBBIN

TexasFatBoy
12-31-2004, 08:26 PM
Not seen it much since I left the Bay Area after law school, but in San Jose and around that area, they have those darn TROLLEY TRACKS that run parallel with the road, often right down the middle of the lane! Usually took another lane as much as possible, but sometimes had to cross em in order to get in the proper lane for a turn. The technique was always to make sure the lane I was going into was clear, moving as far to the outside of the lane I was in as possible, slow down and then cross over the track somewhere between 45-75 degrees, depending on the environment.

Those things are a bitch.

The other one we face here in TX sometimes is the LOW WATER CROSSINGS. Most of the time, you don't know whether there will be water in them or not, so best to slow down until it is in sight, gauge the water level and current and, if possible to cross, do so in a straight line at low speed - no brakes and no jerky acceleration.

Oh, and the other one I've faced here (and bugsquawsher can attest to this one) is cattle in the middle of the road!

Wide
12-31-2004, 08:28 PM
Being from Los Angeles we get a lot of anti freeze on the road.


Anit Freeze
basicly the same as above keep it strait, dont try to turn or brake untill you can get on clean ashfalt & the tires have enough time to wipe themselves clean, then brake, dont lock them up.

You really need to stay in the tire grooves & keep your good eye out for hazzards.

first sign of rain
Also when it starts to rain we get lots of oil to the surface thats like rideing on ice, best to just let it rain for a while, hang out in the dry then ride if you have to.

I remember my first day in the rain out here, tried to stop & nothing, just skidded, luckly I had the smarts to not lock it up & go between the cars slowly applying the brakes to stop.


:D

TexasFatBoy
12-31-2004, 08:29 PM
Almost forgot one more: CATTLE GUARDS which invariably are placed at either the entrance to or the exit from a curve! For those that don't know, ranchers will have a portion of the road in their fence line which is dug out a bit and then a short metal bridge with parallel metal bars placed perpendicular to the road is installed. Apparently the cows have bad depth perception and when they see the light and dark areas, they won't cross because of the perceived danger of getting a foot caught. They can be pretty hazardous if they are wet, so the best tactic is to straighten the bike as much as possible and cross straight over them. Sometimes they are also not even with the road, so also add some of that "steel plate" feel to them.

wreckerman
12-31-2004, 08:39 PM
Although, TFB failed to mention one of the worst rad hazrds you can fined is better known as the ferocious domestic household kitty cat, but seriously all animals in or near a roadway, should always be concidered a road hazard and should be avoided at all costs.
One road hazard that always seems to catch me is diesel fuel run off, from truckers topping their tanks or leaving their gas caps off. This stuff is slicker then elephant snot and although I have never gone down from it, I have witnessed a few, best advice is to avoid it if possible, if not maintain speed do not brake and ride straight through.

TexasFatBoy
12-31-2004, 08:41 PM
I think the bike was a hazard for the kitty, wrecker! :lol:

And I won't even ask how you know the consistency of elephant snot. :blink2: :lol:

momsridin
01-01-2005, 02:42 AM
Deer, my road is covered with Deer. Every member in my family has hit at least one in the car. You must be Oh So Carefull. Another for me is Dump Trucks.... those huge construction dump trucks they round the corners on the wrong side of the road and blow me all over the place.

Wide
01-01-2005, 02:51 AM
Another for me is Dump Trucks.... those huge construction dump trucks they round the corners on the wrong side of the road and blow me all over the place.


Mom, for something like this you need count on the dump truck coming in your lane & not only be mentaly prepaired for it but be in the best position on the road to be safe.


Happy New Year MOM :D

momsridin
01-01-2005, 02:56 AM
Another for me is Dump Trucks.... those huge construction dump trucks they round the corners on the wrong side of the road and blow me all over the place.


Mom, for something like this you need count on the dump truck coming in your lane & not only be mentaly prepaired for it but be in the best position on the road to be safe.


Happy New Year MOM :D
Thanks Wide and Happy New Year to you too....... The last one I encountered blew me completely off the black top. Scared the poo out of me. I was laid way over in a curve feeling overly confident then I'm off the side of the road in the gravel thinking "SH&$". It worked out ok I got it back on the road but..............Took a few hours for me to stop shaking.

tradrockrat
01-01-2005, 03:43 AM
Deer, my road is covered with Deer. Every member in my family has hit at least one in the car. You must be Oh So Carefull. Another for me is Dump Trucks.... those huge construction dump trucks they round the corners on the wrong side of the road and blow me all over the place.

I hit a deer on my 1100 Magna on a rural Howard County road in 1993. Broke the fork brace and the deers back -- also ruined my pants, but that was it. If I had been speeding instead of going the 30 MPH speed limit, I really feel I might not be here today. Lucky for me it was the deers time, not mine and I managed to stay up even though I locked up the rear wheel in a panic stop before slamming into the poor thing. I'm the only person I've ever met to hit a deer and stay up -- pure luck, but I had to stop and get my nerves under control and finish off the deer for humane reasons before I could get back on the damaged bike and limp it home.

Old_Evo
01-01-2005, 05:25 PM
For me it is deer, I do a bunch of up North, back road riding and it's the deer that worry me most.

On a different safety note: Would love to see something written about flat tires while riding. This happened to me many, many years ago, I picked up a nail, and thankfully it was the rear. I would not want to wish this on anyone, when your bike suddenly turns into jello. Was very lucky to keep the bike up on the freeway and drifted over to the shoulder. But I think riders should be prepared on the do's and don't for if, god forbid it happens to someone else.

Drebbin
01-01-2005, 06:06 PM
For me it is deer, I do a bunch of up North, back road riding and it's the deer that worry me most.

On a different safety note: Would love to see something written about flat tires while riding. This happened to me many, many years ago, I picked up a nail, and thankfully it was the rear. I would not want to wish this on anyone, when your bike suddenly turns into jello. Was very lucky to keep the bike up on the freeway and drifted over to the shoulder. But I think riders should be prepared on the do's and don't for if, god forbid it happens to someone else.

I'm on it. Good topic. Stand by for a suggestion. DREBBIN

Drebbin
01-01-2005, 10:32 PM
For me it is deer, I do a bunch of up North, back road riding and it's the deer that worry me most.

On a different safety note: Would love to see something written about flat tires while riding. This happened to me many, many years ago, I picked up a nail, and thankfully it was the rear. I would not want to wish this on anyone, when your bike suddenly turns into jello. Was very lucky to keep the bike up on the freeway and drifted over to the shoulder. But I think riders should be prepared on the do's and don't for if, god forbid it happens to someone else.

Ref your request, here is what I found in my MSF & Riders Edge notes:

1. Prevention - check those tires regularly. At least weekly check the pressure. Then take the time to VISUALLY & PHYSICALLY inspect the tread and tire for foreign objects.

2. IF you do get a flat while moving -

a. STEADY AS SHE GOES - no abrupt inputs of any kind

b. DO NOT use the brake on the flat tire

c. ONLY brake on your good tire

d. Carefully steer to the side of the road.

I have heard mixed reviews about RUN FLAT or such products. Most recently, in this area, I have not found an HD dealer that puts it in their tires. In their words - real messy during changes.

Well, I'd like to hear from others if RUN FLAT or similar products are worthwhile?

HOPE THIS HELPS - DREBBIN

RoadKingScot
01-01-2005, 10:57 PM
Recently the biggest hazard near me in the UK has been lines of mud and grass/straw on the middle of country roads. I usually find the safest way to negotiate these is to try and ride on the least shiny line in the road, either side of the muck. There appears to be more traction there. I also maintain a slow speed in any corners where you can't see your exit point when you enter the turn. I maintain the slow speed by riding the back brake, keeping the revs up and slipping the clutch. I also try not to use the front brake under 30mph unless I'm riding in a straight line.

DaveyJones
01-01-2005, 11:21 PM
Asphalt repair areas. I was riding last summer on my RK and it was about 90 F outside. I stopped at a intersection, then turned right and accelerated. I was about halfway into the turn, when my tires hit the asphalt repair tar. It was about 18 inches across and 10 feet long and running parallel to the direction I was turning. The tar was hot and my tires slid on it like it was ice. I started to go down as my tires slid out from under me, but I was lucky that the tar wasn't wider; my tires caught on the far side of the slick and my bike jerked back upright. This hazard caught my totally by surprise because the intersection was near my work and I rode through it every day when the weather had been cooler. It turned out that it was a seasonal hazard.

TexasFatBoy
01-02-2005, 12:10 AM
Asphalt repair areas. I was riding last summer on my RK and it was about 90 F outside. I stopped at a intersection, then turned right and accelerated. I was about halfway into the turn, when my tires hit the asphalt repair tar. It was about 18 inches across and 10 feet long and running parallel to the direction I was turning. The tar was hot and my tires slid on it like it was ice. I started to go down as my tires slid out from under me, but I was lucky that the tar wasn't wider; my tires caught on the far side of the slick and my bike jerked back upright. This hazard caught my totally by surprise because the intersection was near my work and I rode through it every day when the weather had been cooler. It turned out that it was a seasonal hazard.

Oh yea....tar snakes! We have those here as well and you're right, they can be really slick in the summertime. Try to avoid as much as possibe.

BikerBabe
01-02-2005, 12:16 AM
I went out today with my cousin, and found a whole lot of sand out there. I tried to pick a lane that didn't have any, and stay there, while trying to scope out any black ice. My cousin, who was following, told me my back tire spun out a couple of times, but I didn't feel it.

wreckerman
01-02-2005, 12:58 PM
For me it is deer, I do a bunch of up North, back road riding and it's the deer that worry me most.

On a different safety note: Would love to see something written about flat tires while riding. This happened to me many, many years ago, I picked up a nail, and thankfully it was the rear. I would not want to wish this on anyone, when your bike suddenly turns into jello. Was very lucky to keep the bike up on the freeway and drifted over to the shoulder. But I think riders should be prepared on the do's and don't for if, god forbid it happens to someone else.

Ref your request, here is what I found in my MSF & Riders Edge notes:

1. Prevention - check those tires regularly. At least weekly check the pressure. Then take the time to VISUALLY & PHYSICALLY inspect the tread and tire for foreign objects.

2. IF you do get a flat while moving -

a. STEADY AS SHE GOES - no abrupt inputs of any kind

b. DO NOT use the brake on the flat tire

c. ONLY brake on your good tire

d. Carefully steer to the side of the road.

I have heard mixed reviews about RUN FLAT or such products. Most recently, in this area, I have not found an HD dealer that puts it in their tires. In their words - real messy during changes.

Well, I'd like to hear from others if RUN FLAT or similar products are worthwhile?

HOPE THIS HELPS - DREBBIN



All good advice, and in regards to run a flat or seal a flat I do not believe in any of those products. The product ruins the tire so that no patch or boot could ever be put in for a repair, not that I recommend repairing tires either. This stuff should be used only in extreme emergency just long enough to get you to a service center and at low speed only. Funny thing is we had lots of flats on our golf carts, so one year we filled half the new cars tires with this stuff and half without, at the end of the year there was absolutely no difference in the flat ratio so we quit using the stuff.

TexasFatBoy
01-02-2005, 03:50 PM
On the Hill Country Run last fall we came out after the ride from the motel to go to dinner and found I had a rear flat - picked up a nail somewhere. Magoo had some Fix-A-Flat so we dumped it in and figured we'd leave the nail since it was actually in what was left of the tread. Filled it up and off we went to get some dinner. Well, poor Hellswraith was behind me when the nail let loose about a block later and the Fix-A-Flat sprayed everywhere - including some on him!

Pulled over once again and trusty magoo had some emergency plugs, so we plugged it, filled it again, and off we went - the plug lasted me all the way back to Austin, although I was more concerned with the threads showing through. Shoulda changed the tire before that weekend, but did change it immediately after.

Here's the bald spot by the time I got back to Austin:

Old_Evo
01-02-2005, 11:00 PM
Ref your request, here is what I found in my MSF & Riders Edge notes:

1. Prevention - check those tires regularly. At least weekly check the pressure. Then take the time to VISUALLY & PHYSICALLY inspect the tread and tire for foreign objects.

2. IF you do get a flat while moving -

a. STEADY AS SHE GOES - no abrupt inputs of any kind

b. DO NOT use the brake on the flat tire

c. ONLY brake on your good tire

d. Carefully steer to the side of the road.
[/quote]

Drebbin, the only problem I have with this answer was at the time that this happened to me I have no idea what was going on and did not, nor would I recommend any braking of any kind. Just drift over as soon as you can.

MLC
01-03-2005, 07:48 PM
an earlier mention of TAR SNAKES. New mexico roads are poor at best, we cant go anywhere that there isnt road work going on. In the summer those tar snakes are slick, in the winter they tend to dry up and crack open. so far i've only run into one of them that had opened up almost the exact same size as the front tire on my WG. i had just gone through some rain grooves that made me nervous so i was paying a little extra attention and managed to keep the jerk down to only an unexpected lane change before i rode up and out of it.. i had to pull over and have a couple smokes after that one, scared the bejeeeezus out of me.

UltraHog
01-03-2005, 07:51 PM
Drebbin put is nicely!

YES. THAT MOM ON THE CELL PHONE IN THE MINIVAN REALLY DID NOT CARE THAT SHE ALMOST KILLED YOU. ) dafinger

Spoiled
01-12-2005, 11:20 PM
Asphalt repair areas. I was riding last summer on my RK and it was about 90 F outside. I stopped at a intersection, then turned right and accelerated. I was about halfway into the turn, when my tires hit the asphalt repair tar. It was about 18 inches across and 10 feet long and running parallel to the direction I was turning. The tar was hot and my tires slid on it like it was ice. I started to go down as my tires slid out from under me, but I was lucky that the tar wasn't wider; my tires caught on the far side of the slick and my bike jerked back upright. This hazard caught my totally by surprise because the intersection was near my work and I rode through it every day when the weather had been cooler. It turned out that it was a seasonal hazard.

Being such a rookie, I wondered about what happened to DaveyJones. Isn't your first instinct to put your leg down to catch yourself? Is that what you're suppose to do?

Drebbin
01-12-2005, 11:26 PM
Asphalt repair areas. I was riding last summer on my RK and it was about 90 F outside. I stopped at a intersection, then turned right and accelerated. I was about halfway into the turn, when my tires hit the asphalt repair tar. It was about 18 inches across and 10 feet long and running parallel to the direction I was turning. The tar was hot and my tires slid on it like it was ice. I started to go down as my tires slid out from under me, but I was lucky that the tar wasn't wider; my tires caught on the far side of the slick and my bike jerked back upright. This hazard caught my totally by surprise because the intersection was near my work and I rode through it every day when the weather had been cooler. It turned out that it was a seasonal hazard.

Being such a rookie, I wondered about what happened to DaveyJones. Isn't your first instinct to put your leg down to catch yourself? Is that what you're suppose to do?

I spent the day with a police motorcycle instructor last year. He taught me - and other sources have as well - to keep those feet on the floorboards - UNLESS YOU ARE ALREADY STOPPED. That will help you balance AND save on medical bills. RIDE SAFE - DREBBIN

NY90
01-12-2005, 11:31 PM
NO! do not put your foot down!The crutches are mine.

BikerBabe
01-12-2005, 11:52 PM
Oh 90, you poor thing! :(

buckanddot
01-13-2005, 12:01 AM
bringing in third to deer and tarsnakes to me is road paint....when it's raining. For some reason, there's always alot of it around stoplights and intersections. Go figure. Anyways, it gets pretty greasy when its rained on and has woke me up a coupla times.
:o :unsure: :rolleyes:

TexasFatBoy
01-13-2005, 02:56 PM
And if the paint ain't bad enough, some places have gone to using those plastic lines and stuff at intersections and that stuff is slick as snot on saran wrap when it's wet!

And mom, never try to catch a bike in motion by trying to put a foot down - you're asking for a broken ankle or leg at the least if you try - remember, these bikes are heavy and it's much cheaper and easier to replace bent metal and scratched chrome than skin and bone.

Fxsts103ci
01-13-2005, 03:00 PM
Seems I always find the 4x4 pressure treated wood in the road.. had one get hit by a car in front of me , cars rear end jumped about a foot off the ground sending the 6 or so foot long beam spinning in the road in front of me. And there was nowhere to go , out of just pure luck the beam came to rest perpendicular with the lane and not across it.
I had to run over one and it ruined my front tire had a terrible wobble at 40 MPH .Chech the rim for runout or any damage -none. Guess the cords ripped in the tire new tire and all is well... Think they fall of the tractor trailer trucks..

Drebbin
01-13-2005, 03:45 PM
Seems I always find the 4x4 pressure treated wood in the road.. had one get hit by a car in front of me , cars rear end jumped about a foot off the ground sending the 6 or so foot long beam spinning in the road in front of me. And there was nowhere to go , out of just pure luck the beam came to rest perpendicular with the lane and not across it.
I had to run over one and it ruined my front tire had a terrible wobble at 40 MPH .Chech the rim for runout or any damage -none. Guess the cords ripped in the tire new tire and all is well... Think they fall of the tractor trailer trucks..

That's a good one - thnx, DREBBIN

Ratbike
01-13-2005, 04:15 PM
Deer, skunk, and gator backs (semi tire blow-outs). With deer wotch out in the spring and fall and use caution going down the back roads at sunrise/set. Skunks steer clear or wait them out for a minute. Gator backs avoid them obviously, but if you are trapped in the lane I go for the flattest part and make all adjustments before I hit to avoid turning or braking ontop of it.

01-13-2005, 04:33 PM
Name it?

Here take a look at it. (Talk about dumb-luck.)

Horse
01-13-2005, 04:41 PM
Construction sites / housing development area

The picture from FLH EBAY a good example of what's
on the road that we can't see.

Ratbike
01-14-2005, 04:41 AM
Name it?

Here take a look at it. (Talk about dumb-luck.)
Looks like some sort of new fad in piercing. Next thing ya know everyone will be doing it.

jazda
01-14-2005, 05:00 AM
NAME YOUR ROAD HAZARD:

Me.... spacin' out.........

harley50glide
01-29-2005, 05:59 PM
The illinois tollway i -pass lanes.The drain covers have dips,watch out for oil ,dont use the truck i pass ,and the jag---- that tailgait you when your slowing down just before you enter :rolleyes: dafinger four wheeler tailgater dafinger

frobozz
02-01-2005, 11:23 PM
These babies are a dime a dozen here in the hinterlands..... and if the path of your bike intersects one, you are in a world of hurt.

http://www.mooseworld.com/slideshow4/driving4.htm

Fro...

SchimDog
02-02-2005, 12:11 AM
Any 150 miles of road without a place to get a cold beer!?!?!!? drunks drunks

Tom62
03-14-2005, 05:58 AM
36-24-36,standing on corner in tight fitting shorts and tank top boobs :rolleyes:

JD
03-15-2005, 12:57 AM
Without a doubt the worst: bad drivers.

zman
03-27-2005, 05:20 PM
THE NEIGHBOR LADY WORKIN IN THE YARD IN HER SHORT SHORTS, HAD A COUPLE CLOSE CALLS ON THAT ONE

bowsaw
03-28-2005, 01:59 AM
Hahaha, bad in the city, to much to perve on, where i am here, kangaroos are worse, jump every way stupid things, followed by cattle, then Emus, camels, and dingoes, but mainly roos, some of them stand 6ft tall, and weigh 120kg, not nice to hit, even in a car.

dynaRide
03-28-2005, 02:31 AM
Being from Los Angeles we get a lot of anti freeze on the road.


Anit Freeze
basicly the same as above keep it strait, dont try to turn or brake untill you can get on clean ashfalt & the tires have enough time to wipe themselves clean, then brake, dont lock them up.

first sign of rain
Also when it starts to rain we get lots of oil to the surface thats like rideing on ice, best to just let it rain for a while, hang out in the dry then ride if you have to.

:D

Roger that Wide. The first half hour or so is deadly out here. Out here in Murrieta we have a lot of dirt haulers and cement trucks allways spilling loads too.

Drebbin
03-28-2005, 10:14 AM
Being from Los Angeles we get a lot of anti freeze on the road.


Anit Freeze
basicly the same as above keep it strait, dont try to turn or brake untill you can get on clean ashfalt & the tires have enough time to wipe themselves clean, then brake, dont lock them up.

first sign of rain
Also when it starts to rain we get lots of oil to the surface thats like rideing on ice, best to just let it rain for a while, hang out in the dry then ride if you have to.

:D

Roger that Wide. The first half hour or so is deadly out here. Out here in Murrieta we have a lot of dirt haulers and cement trucks allways spilling loads too.

GREAT INFO - THX ! DREBBIN