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Drebbin
01-14-2005, 12:46 PM
Edmonton Sun (Alberta)

January 13, 2005 Thursday
FINAL EDITION

HEADLINE: RIDING ON TWO WHEELS

After a number of horrific motorcycle deaths last year, the city and the police force are asking the province to look at rewriting some of the licensing requirements for motorcyclists, emphasizing safety and perhaps limiting the size of bikes they can ride after they get their licence.

That's fine by us, as far as it goes.

The ideas being suggested to the province by the cops include limiting the size of motorcycle that can be ridden during the first two years of the licence and making motorcycle safety courses compulsory. It's worth debating the merits of all the ideas put forward.

Not surprisingly, motorcycle enthusiasts, who watch the reputation of their beloved bikes take a hit with every grisly accident, are heartily backing this. As one motorcycle rider told the Sun, a mandatory safety course would be "a good way to weed out people who shouldn't be riding on motorcycles."

It's as good a time as any to pitch this to the province, which is currently putting together a traffic safety plan in response to last fall's traffic safety report from former RCMP assistant commissioner Don McDermid.

And if the Tories are going to heed the advice of local cops and council to further the education of motorcyclists before they're allowed to get their licence, then the province might as well go all the way and endorse our repeated calls to make it tougher for all drivers to get their initial licence, and maybe even retest drivers periodically.

Currently, anyone wanting to ride a motorcycle in Alberta has to get a Class 6 licence, which requires a written examination and a road test, the latter of which also includes a skills test conducted away from regular roadways.

Adding some kind of mandatory training in there would seem to be a complete no-brainer.

But speaking of no-brainers, while we do support more training and re-training for all drivers, not just those on motorcycles, we sometimes wonder if any amount of education will prevent people from succumbing to their own baser instincts. Sgt. Regan James told the Sun this week that he has "caught people on the Whitemud going in excess of 200 kmh on sport bikes."

The sergeant was hopeful that if we can "educate these drivers to ride respectably, that's obviously going to have nothing but a positive impact."

We'd like to think so. But really, is there anyone out there who really thinks that blazing down the Whitemud at 200 kmh on a crotch rocket is a good idea?

Sometimes, all the education in the world can't save people from themselves.

wreckerman
01-14-2005, 03:02 PM
this would be a good step , even thought i hate restictions on my lifestyle.. the only problem i have with this is all drivers need toughfer testing and what about all that drive with out a indorcement or drive on suspended ones.. makes you think

Harley-Ray
01-14-2005, 04:20 PM
I don't like rules that protect me from myself. Helmet laws, etc. I seem to understand that the majority of 2 vehicle accidents involving motorcycles are single vehicle or the fault of the car driver. That being said, I won't disagree that in many situations a more experienced, careful rider may be able to avoid the accident in some situations. Should motorcyclists learn on smaller bikes, probably, should everyone take a riders safety class, probably, should you ride a ultra if you are 5-5 and weigh 120 pounds, probably not, I would rather see some laws that protect me from others, no cell phones while you are driving, no eating the combo meal while driving, make great grandma and grandpa take a skills test to renew their license, all those would do alot more to limit accidents than making more rules to restrict riders. my 2 cents

wreckerman
01-14-2005, 04:31 PM
and add to my post what harley ray said

Drebbin
01-14-2005, 05:21 PM
I don't like rules that protect me from myself. Helmet laws, etc. I seem to understand that the majority of 2 vehicle accidents involving motorcycles are single vehicle or the fault of the car driver. That being said, I won't disagree that in many situations a more experienced, careful rider may be able to avoid the accident in some situations. Should motorcyclists learn on smaller bikes, probably, should everyone take a riders safety class, probably, should you ride a ultra if you are 5-5 and weigh 120 pounds, probably not, I would rather see some laws that protect me from others, no cell phones while you are driving, no eating the combo meal while driving, make great grandma and grandpa take a skills test to renew their license, all those would do alot more to limit accidents than making more rules to restrict riders. my 2 cents

Articulate & thoughtful. Good points, DREBBIN