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wreckerman
01-25-2005, 12:22 AM
Seems their are a lot of our members that like to brew their own Beer recipes. As well as a few that have been doing it for years. So here's a place were you can trade knowledge, can't think of a better place for it, then right next to your favorite food.....

Jetmonkey
01-25-2005, 12:29 AM
Thanks Wreckerman !!! Nothing else (maybe wine, once in a while) goes better with any food than "Liquid Bread". We'll get this going in no time at all...

Jetmonkey
01-25-2005, 12:43 AM
To start with, I would like to say that I really envy the guys up north, not because of the long harsh winters, but because you all have basements!!!
While you can ferment your favorite stuff at a constant (or almost constant) temperature, here in the south I have to depend on an old frezer with an external temperature control. Anyways, I'm still able to brew some really crazy stuff. One of my favorites I call "Devils Breakfast Stout".... Needless to say, I have that for breakfast once in a while.. bottomsup bottomsup

Rusty
01-25-2005, 02:10 AM
I'm all jazzed up about this home brew stuff. Maybe someone could start off with the basic's and go from there.

Spoiler
01-25-2005, 02:21 AM
Ummm ... Home Brew ... 1beer + bottomsup = drunks

Hey Drebbin ... Does this count.

Beer + Wine = Threat

Now you got me hooked. :lol:

Ratbike
01-25-2005, 02:27 AM
Funny thing this topic came up. Right now I am sitting on two batches. One is an attempt at a hard lemonade and the other is a mead (honey based wine). drunks

Slice
01-25-2005, 03:24 AM
I also vote for a beginners primer on brewing. I have an interest as well.

Does one just go throw themselves at the mercy of a brewshop owner?

Thanks. Neat idea for a sticky...

LostLake
01-25-2005, 05:07 AM
Okay.. Where to start.

When you're new to brewing, buy a starter kit. It will include a can of concentrated wort (water strained from boiled grain), a bucket for mixing, a bucket or glass carboy for fermenting, and yeast, sugar and instructions. You will have to bottle your creation and let it carbonate in the bottle.

After you do that a few times and you like what you get from it( Fresh beer is amazing), you will want to make minor changes, like add a little different wort syrup, add some flavoring hops at the end of the boil (you boil your wort for about 60 minutes), or add flavorings to the beer. And it is all good. You won't be able to wait for the next batch, and you may get tired of bottle cleaning so you may want to keg your beer.

You can buy 5 gallon stainless steel soda syrup kegs for about $35 - $70, attach a CO2 bottle to them and you have a keg of beer. One nifty thing about this setup is by turning up the CO2 pressure to about 35psi and tilting the keg back and forth, you can 'force carbonate' the beer in about an hour. Now you can drink your beer the day it is done fermenting, instead of letting it sit in bottles for a week or two. And you don't wash bottles, you wash a big keg.

Then you will want to move on to 'partial mash' brewing, where you stop at your brewing supply house or mail order a couple pounds of grain to your kitchen. This gets cracked in a mill to break the hull, then steeped in water at a specific temperature to release the natural sugars in the grain. Add a can of wort syrup and you have a custom batch that you'll have a hard time duplicating if you like t a lot! Ha Ha , that's a joke but it's not!! You can play with the flavors and the alchohol content and the bitterness all you like. Each batch can be a wonder to behold, and the smells are fantastic while you cook up your batches. During fermentation (when the yeast digests the sugars and creates alchohol) the brew bubbles and foams and it is literally alive and growing in your living room or basement, depending on the temperature you need to hold the beer at. It is very exciting.

Now, here's where we can help each other. Beer is easy to brew, and beer is very difficult to brew. Any dirt will screw up a batch, cleanliness is paramount. Bleach is your friend! Temperature is a variable that can make the same recipe taste completely different. A batch fermenting at 70 degrees for a week will taste unlike the same recipe fermenting at 64 degrees for two weeks. Like Budweiser and Sam Adams different.

Practice makes perfect, and keep a log of what you do. It should say, "full fire wort boil for 45 minutes, pitched 2 oz of Hallatuer hops for last 10 minutes, removed from heat let cool 15 minutes, added 3 gallons of cold tap water, waited for temp to reach 69 degrees then pitched 1 package of Wyeast 205, stirred and put on lid and airlock. Fermented 6 days at 70 degrees, pitched 1 cup sugar and bottled.

That is a trick I liked when I bottled, maybe some of you have done it. Most kits tell you to add a sugar tablet, or 1/2 teaspoon of sugar to a bottle and fill with beer. Then of course you get the bottles that have too little sugar and are flat, and the ones that got too much and explode. Who hasn't laid in bed at night and heard the "BOOM" from the basement and your wife says, "You lost another one". The a few hours later 'BOOM'. Or how about popping the top and having the entire beer foam right out of the bottle like a volcano. Anyway, I used to siphon off the beer from the silt, into a clean bucket, then add all the sugar at once, stir it in the beer, then bottle all my bottles. That made them all consistent.

Okay enough BEER 101. You beginers get a kit and just do it, it wil only cost about $35 and it's loads of fun, and you will make great beer right away.

I am making crappy beer, so I gave up, or took a break for a couple years. I had too many vinegar batches. I was clean, but I don't know if my well water has some bugs in it that could taint my brew. Possible. Also I was boiling 3 gallons slowly ( I have a big burner now) and then cooling took too long before I pitched. I did not start my yeast in a beaker. I used good fresh Wyeast and warmed it just right, but the yeast was slow to take off.
Questions: Should I boil all 5 gallons and use a copper chiller to bring it down fast, then pitch yeast with some nutrient? I think boiling all 5 will purify the water (unecessary?) and adding nutrient may boost the yeast and head off any bugs. I also ferment at about 69 degrees, should I go higher or lower (figure a Pilsner or ale).

And what about cleaning? I worry that spritzing everthing with sterilizer will throw off the taste, but I have friends that say they spray the plastic siphon hose and then dip it in the beer, I would never do that, and maybe that is one of my problems. When I take a specific gravity reading, the hydrometer is laying out on a clean towel, but it was in the beer yesterday, then washed, but should I spray it before dropping it back in?

I'll have more to add later, my wife said forget HCG and get in the sack with me so......I'm no dumby!!!

boobs

Slice
01-25-2005, 02:43 PM
Here's a question for ya, just out of curiousity...

I had and Aunt that used to make a home brew in 15 gallon crocks. I have no idea what the recipe was, but when it was all in the crock she covered it with a white cotton towel and put a light bulb over it.

She bottled this concoction in quart bottles and let them "age".

This was a very yeasty brew but boy did it have a kick. I actually like it and miss it.

Is this the same basic type of process, or is it some "quick and dirty" method of brewing?

frobozz
01-25-2005, 04:39 PM
Questions: Should I boil all 5 gallons and use a copper chiller to bring it down fast, then pitch yeast with some nutrient? I think boiling all 5 will purify the water (unecessary?) and adding nutrient may boost the yeast and head off any bugs. I also ferment at about 69 degrees, should I go higher or lower (figure a Pilsner or ale).

And what about cleaning? I worry that spritzing everthing with sterilizer will throw off the taste, but I have friends that say they spray the plastic siphon hose and then dip it in the beer, I would never do that, and maybe that is one of my problems. When I take a specific gravity reading, the hydrometer is laying out on a clean towel, but it was in the beer yesterday, then washed, but should I spray it before dropping it back in?


Good questions, Professor.... here are my answers...

Always.... ALWAYS.... do full pot boils. I do only 5 gal batches and use a 10 gal Stainless Steel brew pot. I use a King Cooker to boil the goodies.

Yes, use a copper chiller. I made mine from about 100ft. It will bring 7 gals of boiling wort to pitching temps in 15 mins.

I use iodophor to sanitize everything. Cleanliness is ABSOLUTELY critical, and one can not be too obsessive about it. In breweries, the yeast rooms are like hospital operating rooms.


Frobozz

HeadDoc
01-25-2005, 09:00 PM
ok LL and Fro have got a good start for ya.
LEt me add

start saving bottles now. drink them and rinse them out as ya go. you will need about 2 1/2 cases of bottles. not twist offs....get brown ones if possibel becauase brown will prevent ultraviolet rays from "skunking" your brew

get a good book. I started with Dave Millers "Brewing the Worlds Great Beers" (google and see whats out there now)

keep it simple to begin with that means start with an ale of some sort.... no lagers yet..

go from a kit. it will have everything you need to start your first batch (ingredient wise). I'd do two in a row so once you tap your first batch you'll have more to drink cause you'll probably drink the first 2 cases before the next batch is ready. <_<


If you gonna boil on the stove in your OL's kitchen watch carefully as it comes up to a boil....you DO NOT WANT one of the ievitable and dreaded boilovers on her stove...it is a bithc to clean up... It will foam up as it comes to a boil and it will boil over...just turn down the heat a bit till it gets calm and then turn back up once it settles.

then as the one of the god fathers of homebrewing (Charlie Papazian) says "Relax, don't worry have a homebrew"

This will be like baking a cake from the directions on the box....pretty good and definately better than store bought.


don't go crazy buying a bunch of fancy equipment until you get into it. most of my stuff has been picked up used or made for next to nothin.

you will need
a fermenter (plastic food grade 7 gallon bucket with sealing top or glass carboy)
an airlock
some plastic hose for siphoning about 4 1/2 feet (racking in homebrew terms)
a racking cane ( a clear hard plastic hollow cane to hook your siphon hose to)
a pot that can boil at least 4 gallons or more.

Rusty
01-25-2005, 09:05 PM
The internet is a great place for information. I've been reading all day about brewing beer. I have not got anything done here at work today. I also orderd my first kit. I found several sources on brewing and things to watch out for.

Jetmonkey
01-25-2005, 10:41 PM
HeadDoc got you covered very well. Another tip...is you don't like to cap the bottles, spend a few more $$ and buy a couple of cases of Grolsh beer. Not only is very good stuff, but the bottles have a clip on cap that is reusable and the seals are replaceable. Keep in mind that whatever botlle you use it has to be completely sterile, and so is the rest of the equipment.
And last, if your first batch doesn't turn out as you expected, don't give up...every batch you brew is a learning lesson and you'll get better each time...

LostLake
01-26-2005, 02:51 AM
Frobozz: You say you use idophor, but are you afraid to get it in the beer? I would sterilize, then rinse with tap water. I think that's where I started to have problems. If I can get some sterilizer in the beer it will be a lot easier. I would clean and sterilize kegs, then rinse with water to get rid of the sanitizer. Probably my trouble right there huh?

I assume you just toss the copper tube in the wort as she boils to sterilize it, then hook up a garden hose and let the water flow through, and out on the ground. Do you feed and grow your yeast before pitching? Use any boosters?

Slice: Your aunt was making beer, we use airlocks instead of towels over the fermenting tank to keep oxygen out. She would bottle it then 'age' it for carbonation. You see the yeast eats all the sugar and turns it to alcohol and releases carbon dioxide. It is quite exciting to watch the brew take off and grow a thick head of bubbly brown foamy gunk as this happens. Then when it calms down, meaning the sugar is gone for the most part, the dead yeast filters down to the bottom and the hops settles out. You carefully siphon off the clean beer from the top, (of course you taste it and think how great this will be!!!) and either mix in sugar, add sugar tablets in bottles, or keg the beer and force carbonate. There is still some live yeast in the beer, and that new sugar makes it grow and create more CO2. During this stage you have carefully measured teh sugar available to the yeast, and you can be reasonably assured of a good bubbly beer. But rememeber what I said about exploding bottles? That's because of too much new sugar added, or maybe I didn't let the initial fermentation completely end.

If you've never done it, it is exciting the first couple times. My wife and I would sit and watch the air lock... Galoop, a bubble would come up. Hey!! It worked! It's alive!! Then the next day it's Galoop Galoop Galoop, and that's cool, until the third day Gloopgloopgloop and the airlock floods and there is beer on the floor and the house smells like a brewery. Boy that is fun!!

Let's get a few batches started and we can chime in and see how each of us is progressing. I'll start a batch of a Red this weekend I think. I'll have to get out my equipment and clean clean clean. Frobozz, you'll have to tell me how you made the chiller. Solder on hose fittings on the copper? IS there more than one coil? More coils toward the bottom?

frobozz
01-26-2005, 06:05 PM
Frobozz: You say you use idophor, but are you afraid to get it in the beer? I would sterilize, then rinse with tap water. .......

Frobozz, you'll have to tell me how you made the chiller. Solder on hose fittings on the copper? IS there more than one coil? More coils toward the bottom?


The iodine solution must be thoroughly rinsed out. You don't want to drink any sanitizer, but the vessels must be sanitized before use. I use tap water. Must trust the town water, they say.....

Some microbes can be difficult, but the 'vinegar' taste you mention is clearly indicative of an infection. Iodine is easier to manage than bleach, but I have used both at times.... also another called BBrite. I've settled on iodine. I fill by fermentor, for example, with water and add a couple teaspoons of Idophor( it's iodine based) and let it set for an hour or so. Than rinse with tap water and it's ready. I don't sweat the rinsing. If it's free of nasties, the rinsing won't introduce them.

Regarding the chiller. It's just 1/4" id (I think... maybe 3/8 od) flexible copper tubing with the appropriate connectors for my basement sink faucet. No soldering required, and compression fittings. I bent the tubing by wrapping it around a pot, sized properly to fit in my boiler.

Here's a link to some directions. This one includes some soldering to stiffen the sides, I just used some 14/2 electical copper ground wire instead, wrapping the coils.

http://www.bwbd.com/ic.asp

Frobozz

Slice
01-26-2005, 10:09 PM
Rusty,

If you have saved any of those links, would you mind sharing. I'd like to investigate further.

Thanks.

Rusty
01-26-2005, 10:14 PM
Rusty,

If you have saved any of those links, would you mind sharing. I'd like to investigate further.

Thanks.

I have a great one that I've been reading all day long again. It has a lot of great information in it.

Click HERE (http://www.bodensatz.com/staticpages/index.php?page=20020413075309659)


Make sure you read, read and read again.

Slice
01-26-2005, 11:04 PM
Thanks!

Can anyone recommend an online seller of beginner kits?

I've seen some just by using Google, but wondered if you knew of anythat you thought woruld be a good deal. Not looking for the smallest one, just a decent sized beginners kit...

You guys are a bad influence...

bottomsup :D :D

Rusty
01-26-2005, 11:58 PM
Thanks!

Can anyone recommend an online seller of beginner kits?

I've seen some just by using Google, but wondered if you knew of anythat you thought woruld be a good deal. Not looking for the smallest one, just a decent sized beginners kit...

You guys are a bad influence...

bottomsup :D :D

got mine HERE (http://www.undergrounddigital.com/beginners_kits.htm)

HeadDoc
01-27-2005, 12:49 AM
I'll look for some links for you guys tomorrow.

Sanitation - Very important. I use iodopher also but usually my contact time is 5-10 minutes. then dump the solution into the next keg, carboy or bucket and reuse while you are in the brew day. you will have to toss it at the end of the session though. So keep your sanitizing solution around in a bucket on brew day and you can put your utensils, racking cane, hose, hands and arms in it as needed. just rinse with tap water and you are ready to roll.

now with that said you really need to get the big chunks of trub, crud and other various pieces of crap and particles out of your equipment... I like "BLC" Beer Line Cleaner and it is sold just like iodopher. A little of this in your fermenter, kegs beer lines, will make it sparkle like the chrome on a new WideGlide with hardly any elbow grease! Now after that use the sanitizer and rinse....you are ready for the wort and yeast to do their dance at this point.

Infection you say? - well cleanliness is the only way to beat that bitch but also it is a real good idea to have a sufficent yeast slurry ready ....the less lag time (time that you pitch the yeast until it begins to ferment) the better) A quick start and explosive fermentation can some times kick the shit out of any nasties that can ruin beer (or you just have to drink it up real fast before thay have a chance to grow :P )

how do you do that? If your using Dry YEast as a beginner start it up in some warm water AT THE BEGINNING of your brew session and give it a little malt extract to eat while you begin the other steps. If your using a liquid yeast its more complicated (liquid yeast rocks and as you become experienced thats all you will use) . You have to start it early and feed it over a couple of days before your brew day to get a good slurry going.

If it is a second batch thats a Bingo! just rack off the fermented beer into your keg or bottling bucket and dump the next batch of wort right in on top of the crud...don't sanitize, strain or try to remove the muck in the bottom of the fermenter. Just pour in the wort and beat it with a spoon, shake it around , whisk it over a 5 minute period and get it good and aerated then put the cork and airlock back in, or the lid on and stand back....usually that puppy will be sounding like a breaching whale clearing its blow hole in an hour or less....yeah it sounds almost as good as a v-twin with a new set of pipes on it!

one last caution...this shit is addicitve, you run the risk of becoming a beer snob, you won't drink any store bought except for the $$$$ shit from other countries or from american microbrews, your piss will be stronger than most of the light beers on the market and it will smell like hops, you will have two objectives whenver you go somewhere (a) visit the bike shop and (b) find the local microbrewerys, your conversations tend to center around bikes, beer, and the ladies! hey where am I anyway? oh I'm on the HCG talking about bikes and beer , and reading HHC, BB883, Jazdas, Moms, and all of our other fine HCG ladies' posts :wacko:

Rusty
01-27-2005, 01:05 AM
Thanks Doc,

Maybe this sumer if your planning a brew day, and you wouldn't mind, I could ride over from Tulsa and take some notes from you.

I plan on starting my first brew in a few weeks, but there is nothing like getting first hand knowledge from someone that's been around that block.

Tony
01-27-2005, 03:21 AM
Are kits like this worth using?

http://www.iwantmybeer.com/index.html?target=dept_132.html&lang=en-us

Give me your honest thoughts.

LostLake
01-27-2005, 03:21 AM
Thanks HeadDoc for the BLC idea, I never cleaned equipment with it, I have run it through the lines, but for the kegs I used brushes and lots of elbow grease.... It's a pain!! I'll use the BLC from now on.

And I do believe my yeast is taking too long to get going, even though I cool to 70 or 72 degrees, then pitch liquid yeast that has sat for hours and the bag is about to bust open it's so swelled up. But the beer still takes a couple days to start to bubble, then it's kind of lack-luster. That has to be when I'm getting the bad bacteria in there. I will use iodine instead of the commercial cleaner I was using (some kind of safe white powder the shop sold me), and I think I may pitch the yeast into a pint of wort a few hours early to really multiply the yeast. Or maybe it would be easier to just buy two yeast bags instead of one.

You can check out this brewing supply house, I've had good luck with them.
http://www.morebeer.com/

And Head Doc is right about the addictiveness of brewing. First of all the first couple batches always turn out pretty well. The equipment is new and you follow recipes to the letter. Then you start changing stuff and tweaking and like me, some come out funky, some are amazingly fantastic. You WILL drink the first batch in no more than two nights, guaranteed. That's 5 gallons. If you have a friend over it could be gone in the first night. And some batches I didn't like, but my friends did. I had a couple that were very hoppy, I don't care for real hoppy beer.

Then your friends ask ALL THE TIME when the next batch will be done, what are you brewing this week, can you make a porter? Pretty soon you are at the microbreweries shooting shit with the brewmasters, asking when he throws the finishing hops. At this point you are addicted, you will scoff at light beer, be able to tell if that's Cascade hops or Noble, and be depressed if the supplier runs out of two row malt.

Beer is a very old drink, made well back into Pyramidal times. It truly is an amazing wonderful thing, and brewing it will really REALLY make you appreciate it. I can't wait to hear some of the success stories here.

Who has a batch going now? What stage is it in? Does anybody make their own labels?

LostLake
01-27-2005, 03:35 AM
Tony: your link opened up to the main page, if the kit you were looking at was the top left link on that page, that is a mighty nice set-up! Kind of pricey, but it is good equipment and you won't need much more ever to brew for years and years.

Some beginner kits are in the $30 range and you will end up adding quite a bit to them. Just for convenience you will want the bigger better buckets, and the racking cane, the hydrometer is not necessary, but you will use one when you go to a partial or full mash brew. The spigotted bucket is nice, I've never used one, but I would like one!!

I look at it this way: The first couple batches will not be cheaper than buying lite beer off the shelf, but you will learn a lot, and enter a new brotherhood of brewers, learn a new language, and have an appreciation for the intricacies involved in producing a great beer. After the first few batches you may very well produce beer so good that you may never drink a bulk production beer again. You will not get headaches from your beer, and I never had a hangover from homebrew.

I can't wait to hear how your beer turns out. Maybe at the next HCG outing we can all bring a couple of two liter bottles of home brew to share.

Tony
01-27-2005, 03:41 AM
Yeah, it was the $100.24 kit.

Thanks for the info...Im very interesting in doing this.

Man there are lots of good info about this!!!

HeadDoc
01-27-2005, 02:25 PM
Thanks Doc,

Maybe this sumer if your planning a brew day, and you wouldn't mind, I could ride over from Tulsa and take some notes from you.

I plan on starting my first brew in a few weeks, but there is nothing like getting first hand knowledge from someone that's been around that block.

you got it Rusty. watching somebody run through it really helps ya realize how easy it is. I'll let ya know next time I have a weekend brew session

HeadDoc
01-27-2005, 02:27 PM
Are kits like this worth using?

http://www.iwantmybeer.com/index.html?target=dept_132.html&lang=en-us

Give me your honest thoughts.

too expensive and too much shit to start with look here

http://www.heartshomebrew.com/home_brew_beer.cgi

Rusty
01-27-2005, 02:33 PM
Are kits like this worth using?

http://www.iwantmybeer.com/index.html?target=dept_132.html&lang=en-us

Give me your honest thoughts.

I just purchased this one. Click Here (http://www.undergrounddigital.com/beginners_kits.htm) It was cheap enough to start out with and it had all the basics. Then I added one of the brew kits they sell and I'm into my first batch for about $83 bucks. But if you figure out that you like doing it the cost of the initial supplies goes down with each batch brewed. I've done a little math, and you can't go to the store and purchase 60 bottles of good beer for under $35 bucks.

HeadDoc
01-27-2005, 02:41 PM
And I do believe my yeast is taking too long to get going, even though I cool to 70 or 72 degrees, then pitch liquid yeast that has sat for hours and the bag is about to bust open it's so swelled up. But the beer still takes a couple days to start to bubble, then it's kind of lack-luster. That has to be when I'm getting the bad bacteria in there.

Yes a two day lag before fermentation is asking for trouble unless you are clean clean clean....make a starter the week before you are going to brew and feed it a little bit until the big day that will help....I would not spend the extra $$$ on two bags of Liquid...I always keep a couple of pack of dry around for those kind of problems so if nothing happens after a day I toss the dry in too...lots cheaper. also another frequent problem is that the wort is not aereated enough when you pitch... so the yeast takes a long time to build up steam...so like the old Devo song said
"Whip it, Whip it Good" I usually aerate 5 minutes by shaking the carboy like shit. I let that settle and do it again. let the air get into it good .....I have also had a fermentation take off good and then get "stuck" half way through , a problem related to poor aeration in the beginning. my 2 cents

Rusty
01-27-2005, 09:30 PM
Here is another good link to read............


http://www.howtobrew.com/sitemap.html

Rusty
01-28-2005, 02:57 AM
Look what I got in the mail today......

It's their "Amber cerveza"

LostLake
01-28-2005, 04:03 AM
Hey!! I have had a couple batches start off great then peter out after two days or so. I do stir the beer well at the start, maybe I have to do even more...

Great info here!!!! :)

LostLake
01-28-2005, 04:08 AM
Holy cow Rusty, dried malt and extract. That's easy enough, but the crushed malt means you have to extract. You may want to skip that part for now and save the grain for a later batch. Or you could get the water just right and steep the grain in a cheescloth bag kind of like dipping a tea bag.

You graduated right to a partial mash kit. With two different hops, one for flavoring and one finishing. The directions for this kit will be quite involved, but you can do it... and it will make an awesome brew!! :D

frobozz
01-28-2005, 12:41 PM
.... and if you're looking for a high quality and yet inexpensive yeast, I recommend buying a bottle of Sierra Nevada Pale Ale. Pour it off carefully and drink it, leaving the bottom 1/2 inch or so, and then restart the remaining yeast. I've done this several times with excellent results.

Plenty of instructions at various websites.....

The yeast is very similar to this....

http://www.morebeer.com/product.html?product_id=19814

.... but a fraction of the cost.... plus you get to drink an excellent beer !

Frobozz

HeadDoc
01-28-2005, 02:53 PM
.... and if you're looking for a high quality and yet inexpensive yeast, I recommend buying a bottle of Sierra Nevada Pale Ale. Pour it off carefully and drink it, leaving the bottom 1/2 inch or so, and then restart the remaining yeast. I've done this several times with excellent results.

Plenty of instructions at various websites.....

The yeast is very similar to this....

http://www.morebeer.com/product.html?product_id=19814

.... but a fraction of the cost.... plus you get to drink an excellent beer !

Frobozz

absolutely I've done that too...just stay sanitary and build up a starter slurry. I've also brewed Trappist style from yeat cultured from a Bottle of Chimay ....good but not the same as the chimay fermentation yeast. I think they use a separate yeast to carbonate? do you know Fro?

HeadDoc
01-28-2005, 03:02 PM
Holy cow Rusty, dried malt and extract. That's easy enough, but the crushed malt means you have to extract. You may want to skip that part for now and save the grain for a later batch. Or you could get the water just right and steep the grain in a cheescloth bag kind of like dipping a tea bag.

You graduated right to a partial mash kit. With two different hops, one for flavoring and one finishing. The directions for this kit will be quite involved, but you can do it... and it will make an awesome brew!! :D

I would go for it Rusty. because as Emeril says "Kick it up a notch BAM" Steeping crystal malt is a piece of cake. Do Like LL said and make a giant tea bag or just get a small pot and throw it into a quart or so of water. pull it off the heat just before it starts to boil....before the tiny bubbles start to form and let it sit for 30 minutes. then strain through a screen collander and press it down with your hand to get all that good juice. this is going into your brew pot with your syrup and dry malt and water. If you make a cheese cloth teabag then squeeze it till there aint no more juice dripping out. The crystal malt give the beer body and a subtle flavor....depending on what Lovibond (darkness) it is you will get any thing from just a sweet, biscuit nutty taste to carmel to deep roasted flavor like coffee. looking at your pic it looks like your crystal is in the 20 - 60 Lovibond range so It should add body and "mouthfeel", some residual sweet and nutty taste. have fun!

Rusty
01-28-2005, 03:07 PM
Holy cow Rusty, dried malt and extract. That's easy enough, but the crushed malt means you have to extract. You may want to skip that part for now and save the grain for a later batch. Or you could get the water just right and steep the grain in a cheescloth bag kind of like dipping a tea bag.

You graduated right to a partial mash kit. With two different hops, one for flavoring and one finishing. The directions for this kit will be quite involved, but you can do it... and it will make an awesome brew!! :D

I would go for it Rusty. because as Emeril says "Kick it up a notch BAM" Steeping crystal malt is a piece of cake. Do Like LL said and make a giant tea bag or just get a small pot and throw it into a quart or so of water. pull it off the heat just before it starts to boil....before the tiny bubbles start to form and let it sit for 30 minutes. then strain through a screen collander and press it down with your hand to get all that good juice. this is going into your brew pot with your syrup and dry malt and water. If you make a cheese cloth teabag then squeeze it till there aint no more juice dripping out. The crystal malt give the beer body and a subtle flavor....depending on what Lovibond (darkness) it is you will get any thing from just a sweet, biscuit nutty taste to carmel to deep roasted flavor like coffee. looking at your pic it looks like your crystal is in the 20 - 60 Lovibond range so It should add body and "mouthfeel", some residual sweet and nutty taste. have fun!

Thanks for thte encouragemenet DOC. I plan on steeping the grain at 150deg to 160deg for about 25 min.'s using a muslin bag.

I'm a little unsure about the pellet hops. Will they desolve or are they going to leave a residue in the bottom of my wort pot?

HeadDoc
01-28-2005, 04:37 PM
Holy cow Rusty, dried malt and extract. That's easy enough, but the crushed malt means you have to extract. You may want to skip that part for now and save the grain for a later batch. Or you could get the water just right and steep the grain in a cheescloth bag kind of like dipping a tea bag.

You graduated right to a partial mash kit. With two different hops, one for flavoring and one finishing. The directions for this kit will be quite involved, but you can do it... and it will make an awesome brew!! :D

I would go for it Rusty. because as Emeril says "Kick it up a notch BAM" Steeping crystal malt is a piece of cake. Do Like LL said and make a giant tea bag or just get a small pot and throw it into a quart or so of water. pull it off the heat just before it starts to boil....before the tiny bubbles start to form and let it sit for 30 minutes. then strain through a screen collander and press it down with your hand to get all that good juice. this is going into your brew pot with your syrup and dry malt and water. If you make a cheese cloth teabag then squeeze it till there aint no more juice dripping out. The crystal malt give the beer body and a subtle flavor....depending on what Lovibond (darkness) it is you will get any thing from just a sweet, biscuit nutty taste to carmel to deep roasted flavor like coffee. looking at your pic it looks like your crystal is in the 20 - 60 Lovibond range so It should add body and "mouthfeel", some residual sweet and nutty taste. have fun!

Thanks for thte encouragemenet DOC. I plan on steeping the grain at 150deg to 160deg for about 25 min.'s using a muslin bag.

I'm a little unsure about the pellet hops. Will they desolve or are they going to leave a residue in the bottom of my wort pot?


Yeah They'll disolve and foam up on top until theuy get saturated .watch it when you toss the hops in because it could foam up and boil over. don't worry too much about the hops and gunk in the bottom of your pot being transferred into the fermenter...it won't hurt a thing and after the fermentation is over it'll all be in the bottom in a muck cake anyway.

Rusty
01-28-2005, 04:40 PM
Holy cow Rusty, dried malt and extract. That's easy enough, but the crushed malt means you have to extract. You may want to skip that part for now and save the grain for a later batch. Or you could get the water just right and steep the grain in a cheescloth bag kind of like dipping a tea bag.

You graduated right to a partial mash kit. With two different hops, one for flavoring and one finishing. The directions for this kit will be quite involved, but you can do it... and it will make an awesome brew!! :D

I would go for it Rusty. because as Emeril says "Kick it up a notch BAM" Steeping crystal malt is a piece of cake. Do Like LL said and make a giant tea bag or just get a small pot and throw it into a quart or so of water. pull it off the heat just before it starts to boil....before the tiny bubbles start to form and let it sit for 30 minutes. then strain through a screen collander and press it down with your hand to get all that good juice. this is going into your brew pot with your syrup and dry malt and water. If you make a cheese cloth teabag then squeeze it till there aint no more juice dripping out. The crystal malt give the beer body and a subtle flavor....depending on what Lovibond (darkness) it is you will get any thing from just a sweet, biscuit nutty taste to carmel to deep roasted flavor like coffee. looking at your pic it looks like your crystal is in the 20 - 60 Lovibond range so It should add body and "mouthfeel", some residual sweet and nutty taste. have fun!

Thanks for thte encouragemenet DOC. I plan on steeping the grain at 150deg to 160deg for about 25 min.'s using a muslin bag.

I'm a little unsure about the pellet hops. Will they desolve or are they going to leave a residue in the bottom of my wort pot?


Yeah They'll disolve and foam up on top until theuy get saturated .watch it when you toss the hops in because it could foam up and boil over. don't worry too much about the hops and gunk in the bottom of your pot being transferred into the fermenter...it won't hurt a thing and after the fermentation is over it'll all be in the bottom in a muck cake anyway.

I'm also going to do a primary and secondary fermintation process. Just need to get a carboy and I'm set.

frobozz
01-29-2005, 02:35 AM
I've also brewed Trappist style from yeat cultured from a Bottle of Chimay ....good but not the same as the chimay fermentation yeast. I think they use a separate yeast to carbonate? do you know Fro?

Trappist.... yuch.... you're more man than I .... The tought of barn swallows shitting in open fermentation vessels is an image I can't remove from my brain.

I'm afraid I've setttled on three drinks...

Hard liqour: Scotch
Wine: Arid, Parched, Red
Beer: Pale Ale or IPA in the British style, but perfected in America.

fro....

LostLake
01-29-2005, 02:21 PM
Great idea to go primary and secondary Rusty. You leave a lot of mess behind in that primary fermenter. You can use another plastic bucket for a secondary if you want. The advantage is it's easy to clean, the disadvantage is it's more air permeable than glass. Secondary fermentation can last for a month or more depending on the type of beer, so glass is preferred for those brews. Our basic beers ferment a week to ten days so plastic works good also.

I picked up the ingredients to make a amber ale, pure extract. I have to weld trailer for a friend this morning, then make a few snow forts with the kids, maybe get the ATV's out on the lake. Then I will make a wort chiller out of copper tube I just picked up, and clean my old equipment.

I'll take pictures along the way and post them here.

Slice
01-29-2005, 03:28 PM
Rusty,

I just ordered that equipement kit and a couple of ingredient kits from that link you provided.

It should be here Monday or Tuesday.

I'll report on the success (or lack thereof...) as I progress.

Thanks for the link.


Anyone know of a cheaper source for bottles?

Tony
01-29-2005, 03:48 PM
Hey Slice, which kit did you get?

Slice
01-29-2005, 11:36 PM
Tony,

This one:

http://www.undergrounddigital.com/beginners_kits.htm


[/url]

Rusty
01-30-2005, 01:33 AM
Rusty,
Anyone know of a cheaper source for bottles?

I'm drinking my way to having enough empty's..........

LostLake
01-30-2005, 01:57 AM
Rusty,
Anyone know of a cheaper source for bottles?

I'm drinking my way to having enough empty's..........



Hey Slice, Rusty has the idea. You can drink beer and collect the bottles. They have to be returnable bottles however. Or I used to go to the liqour store and ask the owner for a case of bottles from a party. He knows who bought beer on Friday and returned empties on Sunday. Those are fresh clean bottles. You can get a case for the price of the deposit.

LostLake
01-30-2005, 02:30 AM
Here's my latest brew... I set up the kettle in the attached garage. It's better than in the house in case I make a mess....

LostLake
01-30-2005, 02:34 AM
I've got 50' of 1/4" ID copper pipe in the water. I put garden hose ends on the tubing to run cold water through it. Now when I am done cooking the beer I turn on the water and it chills the beer down FAST so I can throw the yeast in sooner. This should help keep out any bad bacteria that might get in the beer from sitting around cooling slowly.

LostLake
01-30-2005, 02:42 AM
I add the malt extract when the water atarts to boil.

It cooks for 30 minutes...

Tony
01-30-2005, 02:46 AM
DAMN you guys are ingenious!!!!!

LostLake
01-30-2005, 02:52 AM
Oops, these post backwards so I'll try again...

LostLake
01-30-2005, 03:01 AM
I didn't know where I'd put the bucket for the first couple days, it should be in an area where the temperature is a stable 65 - 70 degrees. I put it here by the shoe rug, it's in the kitchen where a boilover won't be the end of the world, and I will see it all the time and be able to make sure there's water in the airlock, and monitor the progress of fermentation. I will transfer to a glass carboy for secondary and maybe find a nicer home for the beer to stay. Sorry I didn't get too many pictures in between, but I lik eto hustle to keep open time down, and my wife was busy with the kids so she couldn't snap pics either. When the timer goes off, you gotta do your job and worry about pics later I guess...

wreckerman
01-30-2005, 03:37 PM
You guys are doing a great job with this thread and your sure making me thirsty, are there any sample for me yet? I sure would like to try some.

LostLake
01-30-2005, 03:39 PM
Update: I just saw a couple bubbles of CO2 through the airlock. It has been 14 hours since I put the beer in the primary. The primary is sitting at 70 - 71 degrees. Hopefully by dinner it will be boiling recklessly!

Rusty
01-30-2005, 04:15 PM
Update: I just saw a couple bubbles of CO2 through the airlock. It has been 14 hours since I put the beer in the primary. The primary is sitting at 70 - 71 degrees. Hopefully by dinner it will be boiling recklessly!

Damn, your making me jelous...........Keep us up to date. :)

Slice
01-30-2005, 05:15 PM
You guys are doing a great job with this thread and your sure making me thirsty, are there any sample for me yet? I sure would like to try some.

Wrecker,

If my efforts turn out to be at all drinkable, I'll bring some when I get out your way.

We've been remodeling our house getting it ready to sell. We want to move a little further west. Somewhere from Yorkville to Elburn is the idea.

Hope this beer making works out, I'm thirsty!

Slice
01-30-2005, 05:17 PM
Lostlake,

Those pics are great.

Thanks for posting them.

LostLake
01-30-2005, 05:58 PM
Time: 16 hours PY (Post Yeast)

I feel better now, the airlock is burping a bubble about once per second. It should take off pretty good now, and within 8 to 12 hours I should see the water in the airlock boil. Then I am sure the beer will foam in the bucket and foam will come through the airlock and flow on the floor. The bucket is pretty full of beer, I put a solid 6 1/2 gallons in the brew pot, figuring I'd lose some to boiling evaporation, and then added a couple quarts of extract. Well I figured high and I have a strong 6 gallons of beer now. That's fine though, it's a strong enough beer and I ended up throwing in about 1/4oz more hops than I had planned, so all in all it may be just perfect!

I may bottle this batch to get some more good pictures for this thread. I have some nice 1 litre bottles I bought when my buddy quit brewing (illness) and they are really clean. I also have some 16oz bottles. If it is a fantastic beer I will ship some out to you guys to sample, if it's so-so I'll keep it here and drink it.

Bottling and/or kegging is still a good week away however. Did anyone else start a batch this weekend? I know there were several that had some going before, anybody bottling right now?? bottomsup

HeadDoc
01-30-2005, 06:46 PM
Time: 16 hours PY (Post Yeast)

That's fine though, it's a strong enough beer and I ended up throwing in about 1/4oz more hops than I had planned, so all in all it may be just perfect!



hey LL you better be carefull you will become a harley ridin hop head B)

heres' one for the strange but true files... one of my brothers also is a hardcore brewer. we are both hop heads. well both of us often carry hop oil with us ...then when we are in a beer challenged wssteland we can take a draft of whatevers on tap and put about 3-4 drops of hop oil in it and viola' its got aroma..needless to say that will get more looks in a bar than you can belive :P

your brew looks good great photos I usually set my wort chiller in during the last 15 minutes and the boil sterilizes it then. this allows me to stir it around a lot with out bangin my copper...also I will set my lid on the pot slightly cracked to prevent too much evap. if you have your chiller in during the entire boil you can't put a lid on it. B)

LostLake
01-30-2005, 07:46 PM
Great idea HeadDoc. I did want the lid on.

I just made the chiller, it was the virgin run. I want to take some short pieces of copper tubing and solder them vertically on the chiller coils to solidify the coils. Alas, my solder was in my plumbing box at the new house I'm building for my folks, so it went in loose. Worked great though!!

One other problem I had was the new kettle I bought is a cheapy, the bottom is really thin. With the monster burner I have I easily scorched the beer on the bottom. I need to add some stainless on the bottom, or get an aluminum disk to put under the kettle to disipate the heat.

18 hours PY: Bubble rate is still only 15 per 10 seconds. C'mon baby... gotta roll!!

Tony
01-30-2005, 10:26 PM
Okay, you guys need to get a couple of Tech pages on this site to post your brewing methods and tips!!!

HeadDoc
01-31-2005, 12:23 AM
Great idea HeadDoc. I did want the lid on.

18 hours PY: Bubble rate is still only 15 per 10 seconds. C'mon baby... gotta roll!!

in that AOL voice ...."You've Got Beer!"

way to go

Rusty
01-31-2005, 01:07 AM
It's starting to lok like we need a new forum or sub forum for home grewing..............

LostLake
01-31-2005, 02:17 AM
I moved the primary over near the fireplace. Too much door opening today and the temp had fallen to the upper 60's. A couple minutes in front of the fire and the bubbles are starting to come faster. Tomorrow I go to work and usually have the thermostat set back, I think I'll leave the heat up though. I wonder if anyone makes a blanket that you can wrap around a pail to keep the beer at 70 or 72 degrees? Maybe a fish tank heater would work.

Maybe I have an idea for a new product here. Or I could set the pail in a box with a light bulb, and hook the power up to a thermostat. There must be something out there... I'll have to look around.

HeadDoc
01-31-2005, 06:36 PM
hey LL... a lot of the ale yeasts can tolerate down into the mid 50s with no problems...just takes it a little longer to hit your final gravity. I actually prefer to ferment ales in the 60 degree range because it makes a cleaner tasting finished product.

WYEAST 1056 Ameriucan Ale is my all tim e favorite.....and thats the one thats in the Sierra Nevade too (i think)

B)

Fxsts103ci
01-31-2005, 06:39 PM
here ya go Lostlake http://www.morebeer.com/browse.html?keyword=fermwrap&x=12&y=12 someone beat ya to it. I bought a kit over the weekend goint to give it a try.. Anybody here of Brew house non boil wort? they send it staight from the brewery here is a link http://www.thebrewhouse.com/what_is/index.htm

HeadDoc
01-31-2005, 06:39 PM
I wonder if anyone makes a blanket that you can wrap around a pail to keep the beer at 70 or 72 degrees? Maybe a fish tank heater would work.

Maybe I have an idea for a new product here. Or I could set the pail in a box with a light bulb, and hook the power up to a thermostat. There must be something out there... I'll have to look around.

I've hear of putting the fermenter in a cardboard box with a light bulb, but never had to do it we usually have the opposite problem down here how to keep it cool. B)

LostLake
02-01-2005, 03:04 AM
HeadDoc: I am using the Wyeast 1056 in fact. The bubbles have dropped in frequency today, down to about one every three seconds. I am used to having my beer sit for 36-48 hours then take off and foam over it bubbles so fast. This is a different batch again! I know the yeast prefers 60-70 degrees (read the label), but it really takes off when it's warm, and that's a good thing at the start.

FX103: thanks for the link, I'm going to check that out. It would be perfect to stick in my cool basement and keep it at the exact temperature I need to produce consitent results.

Some Hop Head please tell me the slow bubble rate is okay, or I'm going to freak and rip the top off and toss in more yeast and stir it up....

Ya know the first 5 or 6 batches I did turned out great. Then I started farting around too much. I should just chill and let the beer do its thing. It will be fine.... Deep breaths....

Rusty
02-01-2005, 03:24 AM
HeadDoc: I am using the Wyeast 1056 in fact. The bubbles have dropped in frequency today, down to about one every three seconds. I am used to having my beer sit for 36-48 hours then take off and foam over it bubbles so fast. This is a different batch again! I know the yeast prefers 60-70 degrees (read the label), but it really takes off when it's warm, and that's a good thing at the start.

FX103: thanks for the link, I'm going to check that out. It would be perfect to stick in my cool basement and keep it at the exact temperature I need to produce consitent results.

Some Hop Head please tell me the slow bubble rate is okay, or I'm going to freak and rip the top off and toss in more yeast and stir it up....

Ya know the first 5 or 6 batches I did turned out great. Then I started farting around too much. I should just chill and let the beer do its thing. It will be fine.... Deep breaths....

I wouldn't get to uptight yet. It sounds like it's going along pretty well. When did you put it in the 1st fermentation container?

Rusty
02-01-2005, 03:43 AM
Hey head doc, Did you know bout this place in Tulsa?

http://highgravitybrew.com/index1.html

ChevyReb
02-01-2005, 04:11 AM
Hello everyone,

I hear people talking this brew making up in several forums lately so it must be making a comeback. I have a lot of equepment for home brewing but I have been inactive for quite a while. When I quit I was tired of just making the beer from the surup cans and was interested in going to the next level and making my own wort. I did not ever get around to it but I may just get back into this hobbie.

I talked to the owner of a local Brew Pub here where I live a few days ago and asked about coming down next time they have a fermenter avaiable to watch the process. He said no problem come on anytime. He also said they were contemplating to start selling home brew kits soon. I told him that would probably go over well. Possibly there could be a home brew taste test meeting once a month or something.

Check out this site. They have been around for a while and have some great products.

http://www.williamsbrewing.com

For temerature controlled fermenting look here...

http://www.williamsbrewing.com/AB1605000/showprod.cfm?&DID=7&User_ID=415451&st=3886&st2=-75293097&st3=-68343318&CATID=12&ObjectGroup_ID=72


Later,

HeadDoc
02-01-2005, 03:52 PM
Hey head doc, Did you know bout this place in Tulsa?

http://highgravitybrew.com/index1.html

ALRIGHT Rusty :D ...thanks man I did not know about it and I have mail ordered 55 lb sacks of grain for yeasrs..the prices for bulk grain look good. Thanks for the heads up ....Much appreciated. I will stop in over there next time I'm headed east.

LostLake
02-02-2005, 01:56 AM
Okay, today the bubbling has slowed to 1 every 4 seconds. I put the beer in the primary on Saturday night, so it has been three days. I am going to transfer it to the secondary tonight, leaving most of the sludge on the bottom of the primary. The transfer will mix up the beer a little, help the yeast finish its job, and aid in cleaning by leaving a lot of the fines behind.

Here I go...

LostLake
02-02-2005, 04:42 AM
I transfered beer from the primary to the secondary tonight. I chose too large of a carboy for the secondary and there is a bit too much headspace. The beer is bubbling already, which releases CO2. The CO2 is heavier than air and forces the oxygen out of the carboy which then prevents spoiling. (When filling kegs with beer I always fill the keg with CO2 to force out the oxygen before putting beer in them.)

You can see even though this is a mild ale, the color is pretty dark, and it's cloudy. Some of the darkness came from my cooking it I'm sure; I did burn it a little on the bottom. The cloudiness will dissipate and the beer will lighten a bit as the fines drop out of suspension. I will add a gelatin in a day or two to bind all the fines together and let them settle out. This is the first time I have tried that but I figure 'what the heck?' I'm going to bottle this batch and I would like some clear good looking beer, (especially if I send some out to some of you to critique for me!!!)

How are you guys doing on your batches????

Rusty
02-02-2005, 02:14 PM
LL, you got me all jazzed up. Looks like your beer is going to be fine. Is that a 6 gal. carboy?


I'm going to cook my wort tonight. I'll have the brew bitch take pictures of the whole process so I can post them here.

HeadDoc
02-02-2005, 07:29 PM
I transfered beer from the primary to the secondary tonight. I chose too large of a carboy for the secondary and there is a bit too much headspace.

You can see even though this is a mild ale, the color is pretty dark, and it's cloudy. Some of the darkness came from my cooking it I'm sure; I did burn it a little on the bottom. The cloudiness will dissipate and the beer will lighten a bit as the fines drop out of suspension. I will add a gelatin in a day or two to bind all the fines together and let them settle out. This is the first time I have tried that but I figure 'what the heck?' I'm going to bottle this batch and I would like some clear good looking beer, (especially if I send some out to some of you to critique for me!!!)

How are you guys doing on your batches????

lookin good LL.

No worrys at all about head space in the carboy ...doesnt make a bit of differrence....you can make grenades if you have too much headspace when bottling though especially because you cap them.

Ideally you would have another batch ready to dump into your now empty primary fermenter. that would get a second use out of a good yeast. You can also take the yeast from your secondary and get a third and fourht use from it.

In terms of cloudiness... a good rolling boil, a quick chill down wiht your wort chiller will take most of the protein chunks out...(without finings in the fermenters) I throw in a Teaspoon or so of Irish Moss in the last 10 minutes of the BOIL and never had a problem with cloudy beer.

Ok now no matter how clear the beer looks at room temp when you bottle...IT WILL HAZE up when you first chill it. That chill haze will go away if you get the beer really cold and leave it for a couple of weeks (I know impossible :P ) but if ya brew several batches in a row you can eliminate the chill haze with temperature and aging.

Last comment...the beer in the carboy WILL always look darker than when you pour in the glass (Look at you r bottling hose whn ya keg or bottle and that will give you an idea of how dark it will be

ME? I love a stronger darker hazy beer with lots of hops and mouthfeel <_<

It is almost impossible to make a "light beer" colored homebrew without resorting to lots of adjuncts like rice and or corn but htat violates the Rheinheitsgebot! (sp)? and I don't drink no stinkin' light beer anyway...thats for makin bbq sauce juker

keep up the great work buddy!

LostLake
02-03-2005, 04:03 AM
I didn't use Irish Moss HeadDoc, I did pick up some gelatin today, and a pound of dry malt extract. I'm going to use the malt instead of sugar for the carbonation hoping to get more mouth in the beer. Bubbles have slowed to every 9 seconds and the foam on top is thinning. I'm not sure when to add the gelatin, that's new to me.

I'm going to try just putting the clean bottles in the dishwasher for sterilizing and using the heated dry cycle for the actual sterilizing.

As for the carboy size, it is a 7 gallon, I have a five gallon too. I like to minimize head space because that is just air that is full of bacteria.

I should be bottling this weekend if bubbling keeps slowing!

Rusty
02-03-2005, 03:18 PM
OK, I brewed my first batch last night. Brewing beer could become habit froming. Or is that drinking beer while brewing could become habit forming? Anyway, I pitched the yeast at 11:45 pm last night and put it away. Just waiting for the airlock to start bubbleing. I had my wife take a few pics. I'll get them up tonight.

LostLake
02-04-2005, 04:07 AM
Cool Rusty, can't wait to see the pics!!

Now I've read that the gelatin can take out too much of the yeast and affect the carbonation so I think I'll skip the gelatin unless I keg a batch. My foam is thin thin thin on top and bubbles are very seldom. I'm bottling either Friday night or Saturday.

tradrockrat
02-04-2005, 05:00 AM
I've only been skimming this thread cause I'm a fair weather brewer (meaning I hang out and help my brother when ever I'm around and he's brewing), but has anybody told the true secrtet to great homebrew?

The secret is to add a little of your still hot brew (wort?) to a shot of scotch just before cooling the rest with your chiller. Drink that while the rest cools and you'd be amazed at how great the beer turns out!!! ;) :lol: It's a tradition with my bro and I, and the part of brewing I'm best at!

Rusty
02-04-2005, 02:16 PM
Cool Rusty, can't wait to see the pics!!

Now I've read that the gelatin can take out too much of the yeast and affect the carbonation so I think I'll skip the gelatin unless I keg a batch. My foam is thin thin thin on top and bubbles are very seldom. I'm bottling either Friday night or Saturday.

I've heard that you want to add the gelatin during the 2nd fermentation phase. I think if you do it then you will be safe in doing so. Here is a link you can do a search and some reading about it.


Click Here (http://www.brewboard.com/index.php?act=idx)

Rusty
02-04-2005, 11:23 PM
Here are some of the pics...........

Click Here (http://harleychatgroup.com/index.php?name=coppermine&file=thumbnails&meta=lastup&cat=11216&page=1)

HeadDoc
02-05-2005, 04:37 PM
looks like a 100% success my man! let us know how it tastes in a couple of weeks

HD B)

LostLake
02-05-2005, 07:02 PM
Thanks for the pics Rusty!

I'll bottle mine tonight I think, right now it hit 50 outside so I'm taking the bike out. Got her back yesterday with the stage 1 on, and it really does make a difference!!!

Rusty
02-06-2005, 12:41 AM
Thanks for the pics Rusty!

I'll bottle mine tonight I think,


How long was yours in the ferminter?

I'm going to rack mine into the secondary next weekend then bottle 2 weeks after that.

LostLake
02-06-2005, 03:24 PM
How long was yours in the ferminter?

I'm going to rack mine into the secondary next weekend then bottle 2 weeks after that.

Mine was in the primary for three days, in the secondary for 4 days. It is definitely done bubbling, the top of the beer is almost completely clean. There is just a little bit of yeast or whatever that stuff is floating on the top yet, but I haven't seen a bubble in two days. I had a pretty steady bubbling going for a while, and there is only something like 5lbs of malt in the recipe, so I'm semi-confident it's ready to bottle.

Rusty
02-06-2005, 04:26 PM
How long was yours in the ferminter?

I'm going to rack mine into the secondary next weekend then bottle 2 weeks after that.

Mine was in the primary for three days, in the secondary for 4 days. It is definitely done bubbling, the top of the beer is almost completely clean. There is just a little bit of yeast or whatever that stuff is floating on the top yet, but I haven't seen a bubble in two days. I had a pretty steady bubbling going for a while, and there is only something like 5lbs of malt in the recipe, so I'm semi-confident it's ready to bottle.

LL, The reason I ask is because Mine has been in the (Primary) ferminter for 84 hours (3+ days) and didn't bubble at all for 48 hours. Now it has almost stopped. Only 1 to 2 bubbles every min. I guess I'll prob. wait another day or two and then rack to secondary.

LostLake
02-07-2005, 03:45 AM
Yikes Rusty...

A fast start is insurance against off tastes. Mine was bubbling within a few hours, and was slowing after two days. What did you use for yeast? How did you start it? What was the temp of the beer when you pitched the yeast?

I did not bottle yet. I swirled the carboy and broke up the bubbles on the top surface of the beer and new bubbles formed again. I get a bubble every minute or two, so it's still fermenting. It won't hurt to let it sit another day or so.

Now when you switch to the secondary, you may want to add yeast, or aerate the beer during transfer. You need to get some action going.

Rusty
02-07-2005, 03:13 PM
Yikes Rusty...

A fast start is insurance against off tastes. Mine was bubbling within a few hours, and was slowing after two days. What did you use for yeast? How did you start it? What was the temp of the beer when you pitched the yeast?

I did not bottle yet. I swirled the carboy and broke up the bubbles on the top surface of the beer and new bubbles formed again. I get a bubble every minute or two, so it's still fermenting. It won't hurt to let it sit another day or so.

Now when you switch to the secondary, you may want to add yeast, or aerate the beer during transfer. You need to get some action going.

Ya, I pitched the yeast too soon. I had to jump start the yeast after about 36 hours after no activity. (jump started with another packet of nottinghams) But then it boiled fast after that. It had slowed to less than 1 bubble per min. last night. I swirled it and now it's not doing much at all. But everything looks and smells good. I'm going to rack to secondary tonight. I'll let it sit in the secondary for two weeks.

HeadDoc
02-07-2005, 09:16 PM
Yikes Rusty...

A fast start is insurance against off tastes. Mine was bubbling within a few hours, and was slowing after two days. What did you use for yeast? How did you start it? What was the temp of the beer when you pitched the yeast?

I did not bottle yet. I swirled the carboy and broke up the bubbles on the top surface of the beer and new bubbles formed again. I get a bubble every minute or two, so it's still fermenting. It won't hurt to let it sit another day or so.

Now when you switch to the secondary, you may want to add yeast, or aerate the beer during transfer. You need to get some action going.

Ya, I pitched the yeast too soon. I had to jump start the yeast after about 36 hours after no activity. (jump started with another packet of nottinghams) But then it boiled fast after that. It had slowed to less than 1 bubble per min. last night. I swirled it and now it's not doing much at all. But everything looks and smells good. I'm going to rack to secondary tonight. I'll let it sit in the secondary for two weeks.

If it smells good and tastes good it will only get better. I've had a few "mystery " ferementations too. I think I drank too many homebrews and slept through the whole fireworks show. I have had complete fermentations of 5 gallons in 8 hours depending on the specific gravity and the vigor of the yeast. A sure fire way to tell is to look in your fermenter for the tell tale ring of grunge up above the beer. if its there, then you missed the fermentation because the krausen has already fallen. Nottingham Ale yeast (dry) will give a good strong fermentation. It will not hurt anything at all to leave it in the primary for 2-3 weeks and in a secondary for 3-4 weeks,, just keep it cool and dark. (I never couild do it though because I always needed more beer) I toasted you guys last night during the SuperBowl with a nice American PAle Ale! drawn right from the keg. <_<

LostLake
02-07-2005, 11:31 PM
Okay, NOW the fermenting is done! The top of the beer is as clear as glass. All bubbles have disappeared and it is flat as heck. Karate tonight however, so bottling may be tomorrow.....

Rusty
02-08-2005, 12:35 AM
Well when I got home tonight I took a gravity reading of 1.011. The final should be 1.007 to 1.009. So I went ahead and transfered to the secondary. Took a little taste and I'm impressed.

LL, I'm glad to hear your beer is turning out well. Fill us in on how the bottling goes..

Rusty
02-08-2005, 12:41 AM
I found a new website that helps you create your own recipie's

It's http://www.beertools.com

Jetmonkey
02-08-2005, 03:17 AM
Rusty, if you want a really good program to make your own recipies try seraching for "SUDS" (probably suds.com). I've been using that for about 8 years and is great, specially if you do all grain stuff. It will even calculate the temperature for your sparge tank, or mash temps for single or multiple infusions. The best part is that you can change the main database to reflect the actual values of of ingredients.

Slice
02-08-2005, 03:07 PM
You guys are all making me jealous.

My beginners kit and all the goodies has showed up, but I came down with a nasty flu.

Still waiting until I can give it a try.....

wreckerman
02-08-2005, 11:21 PM
slice get well soon , so i can try your beer

Slice
02-09-2005, 05:14 AM
:lol: :lol: drunks

LostLake
02-09-2005, 01:59 PM
I bottled the beer last night, but took no pictures (house was too messy).
I primed with a cup of dry malt. Had to suck on the siphon hose to get the beer flowing, (should have gargled with whiskey first) then filled the bottles using a filler stick. First time with one of those, and boy are they nice!

Some of the bottles I bought were dirty inside and the dishwaher was full with other bottles, so I hooked my bottle washer brush on my drill and power washed the extra bottles. Boy, that works nice too!
Now I just wait a couple of weeks for carbonation. I tried the beer after I added the extra malt, and it was sweet and malty (duh). More mild than I thought it would be, not real hoppy either. I know carbonation will bring out some hoppiness, but this was really smooth. That's good because I'm not big on bitter hoppy beer.
The wait is a killer, I think I'll start another batch to pass the time....

Rusty
02-09-2005, 02:31 PM
The wait is a killer, I think I'll start another batch to pass the time....

I'm already thinking of doing another batch............Prob. try a IPA......or a blonde.

Rusty
02-15-2005, 08:30 PM
Well, I bottled last night. Everything went great and now I have 47 bottles of beer for about $30 bucks.

Also, I got the bug and brewed a Light beer this past Sunday. So I have another batch in the primary now.

Tony
02-15-2005, 08:33 PM
Okay, you got me hooked, Im buying mine this week.

Rusty
02-15-2005, 08:36 PM
Okay, you got me hooked, Im buying mine this week.

Whatcha gonna buy Tony?

I did a lot of research before I purchased. (To much I think)

Tony
02-15-2005, 08:41 PM
Im going to get the Brewers Best Hardware Kit with Bottles for 97.70, and probably get a Cream Ale or Amber Ale kit to start with.


http://www.undergrounddigital.com/beginners_kits.htm

Rusty
02-15-2005, 08:46 PM
Im going to get the Brewers Best Hardware Kit with Bottles for 97.70, and probably get a Cream Ale or Amber Ale kit to start with.


http://www.undergrounddigital.com/beginners_kits.htm

Same place I got mine from. Great price. They shipped my stuf the same day I ordered it. From time of order to delivery time was three days. I felt like a kid at christmas. Since then I found a local home brew store and added a 6 gal. glass carboy and some other misc. items. Just make sure you follow the instructions on cleaning and sanitizing and you can't go wrong. Also check out what this guy says about brewing.

http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter1-1.html

Tony
02-15-2005, 08:56 PM
Cool! Thanks for that info. I skimmed it real quick but will end up printing that one out.

I have heard that making sure everything is sterile and sanitized is the best start no matter what, so I will make sure I do it to the letter.Im looking forward to starting.

LostLake
02-16-2005, 01:18 AM
Great to hear another batch start!!

Mine is sitting in bottles, I'm waiting semi-patiently. They should be done carbonating today or tomorrow, I may toss one in the fridge just to try it, and put the rest down stairs to age for a week... Man this is the hardest part!

I'm looking for a good recipe for the next batch, I had some old ones from years ago, maybe I'll dig them out.

I also bought a book full of clone recipes, with a recipe for everything from Guiness to Miller Lite, I wonder where that book went.... Used it to make a Sam Adams that was just fabulous!!

Slice
02-16-2005, 02:55 PM
LostLake,

If you find that book on cloning please let us know about it. Sounds like it would be nice to have.

I hope to get my first batch done this weekend.





Bill

Rusty
02-16-2005, 05:16 PM
It turns out my wife and daughters want me to make them a beverage. And since none of them really like beer, I found a grapefruit wine that I'm going to make. It's not a kit, just a recipe that I found that will make 1-gallon batches. Looks like I'm going to make a little Mad Dog........ :P


edited to add:
1 large can (1 lb. 3 oz.) grapefruit sections in syrup
1 pint of pure white grape juice
2 lbs. white sugar
1 tsp. yeast nutrient
1 tsp. pectic enzyme
¼ to ½ tsp. tannin
water to make up 1 gallon
1 pkg white wine yeast
Put 1 quart water on to boil. Meanwhile, dump grapefruit sections and syrup in primary and crush with hands. Add sugar to boiling water and stir well until it is dissolved. Pour boiling water in primary. Cover and allow to cool to room temperature. Add all ingredients except yeast. Stir and cover. Add yeast the next day. Recover primary and stir daily for 5-7 days. Strain through nylon straining bag and squeeze well. Transfer liquid to a secondary and cap with an airlock. Rack after 30 days and again when wine clears. Stabilize and allow another 30 days. Bottle and enjoy immediately.

Tony
02-16-2005, 09:57 PM
Good Luck with it Rusty, let us know how it turns out!

LostLake
02-17-2005, 03:38 AM
You Betcha!!!!!

Popped the top on the bottle I had chilled last night... Mmmmmmm :P

It's all I hoped it would be, smooth and not hoppy, has a great amber color with a touch of chill haze. The sediment on the bottom stays put through the pour, but rinses out easily. Kind of tastes like a Sam Adams with less hops. Not real malty, not sweet, but still full on the tongue. Very drinkable in quantity!!

I shot a picture just before I finished the glass, forgive me but this was only two gulps in, and that's a 16oz glass (my bottles are 16oz and liter size). I would like a touch more carbonation, so I'll leave the rest of the bottles sit out for a couple more days just to see if they carbonate any more, but I have to get the next batch started soon, this ones going to go fast!!!

I'm really happy I have no cidery taste. That's either because I had a fast start to fermenting, or because I used malt to prime instead of sugar...

I am just one hell of a happy guy right now... I always am when a batch comes out great....

Tony
02-17-2005, 04:47 AM
I have to say it looks damn great!!! Good job!!!!

Rusty
02-17-2005, 01:32 PM
Great looking beer LL. I can just hope that mine looks that good.

The batch of "American Lite" that I brewed up last sunday went into the secondary last night. It is a real light colour. And it smelled great. Maybe I'll get lucky and one of my beers will look as good as yours. Congrats on the fine looking beer.

Tony
02-17-2005, 04:46 PM
Well I ordered mine last night. Also added a wort chiller with a faucet adapter as well. And decided to try a batch of Creme Ale first. I cant wait to get it and get going. The great part is I have soooo muh damn info now, I cant go wrong. And yeah, steriliation and sanitization comes first! See? I listened to ya's!!!

Rusty
02-17-2005, 04:56 PM
Well I ordered mine last night. Also added a wort chiller with a faucet adapter as well. And decided to try a batch of Creme Ale first. I cant wait to get it and get going. The great part is I have soooo muh damn info now, I cant go wrong. And yeah, steriliation and sanitization comes first! See? I listened to ya's!!!

Damn, you went all out. I think you'll be glad you have a wort chiller. I've only brewed two batches and I already wish I had one. Sure would cut down on the time spent trying to get the wort temp down to pitch the yeast.

Tony
02-17-2005, 05:01 PM
Well the small ones are only 37 bucks, so I figured it would be worth it, and help with cool down better than trying to do the ice thing and such.

How long does it take without a chiller to cool down?

Also, anyone done Creme Ale before?

Rusty
02-17-2005, 05:07 PM
Well the small ones are only 37 bucks, so I figured it would be worth it, and help with cool down better than trying to do the ice thing and such.

How long does it take without a chiller to cool down?

Also, anyone done Creme Ale before?

Takes me the better part of an hour to get my wort cooled to below 90 deg. F.

I've never done a Creme Ale, but it sure sounds good.

Tony
02-17-2005, 05:12 PM
I've never done a Creme Ale, but it sure sounds good.

Got it from the same site you bought from. Seems like a good place to buy from. Seems like an inexpensive yet complete ingrediant kit to make a batch with.

Any hints from your assessment of the kits?

Rusty
02-17-2005, 05:19 PM
I've never done a Creme Ale, but it sure sounds good.

Got it from the same site you bought from. Seems like a good place to buy from. Seems like an inexpensive yet complete ingrediant kit to make a batch with.

Any hints from your assessment of the kits?

The Brewers best kits are some of the best out there. You will find some grains in that kit, which will allow you to add some more flavor to your beer. Steeping the grains is easy and will add alot of flavor. The local home brew store here in Tulsa carries those kits and they even say that, they are the Best extract kit. With all the information you have about brewing and the ingreediant kit you purchased, that should be one fine beer your making. If you have a digital camera, take some pics along the way and keep us updated as to your progress.

Tony
02-17-2005, 05:30 PM
With all the information you have about brewing and the ingreediant kit you purchased, that should be one fine beer your making. If you have a digital camera, take some pics along the way and keep us updated as to your progress.

Cool, Im excited as hell now.

I will make sure I take pics as I progess along. I appeciate tall the help!!

Rusty
02-18-2005, 01:47 AM
Well, I gathered up all the stuff and made my grapefruit Mad Dog tonight. Bought a couple of gallon jugs so when I finally get to drink it in a couple of months, I'll drink it right from the jug.

Tony
02-18-2005, 03:12 AM
Well, I gathered up all the stuff and made my grapefruit Mad Dog tonight. Bought a couple of gallon jugs so when I finally get to drink it in a couple of months, I'll drink it right from the jug.

It takes a couple months?

LostLake
02-18-2005, 04:51 AM
That grapefruit maddog sounds interesting too!

I had a couple more brews tonight and they are just as good as the night before..... mmmmmm happy happy joy joy!

I have to get another batch going!!

Oh, cooling the wort down can take anywhere from instantly cool if you use enough cold water and / or ice, to 10 hours or so! I had a batch that wouldn't cool once. I had it in ice water in the sink, and was stirring it constantly, it just wouldn't cool! I'm sure lots of bacteria got a head start in that batch!!

Oh, by the way....

Happy Happy
Joy Joy :P :P :P

Tony
02-18-2005, 07:35 AM
Oh, cooling the wort down can take anywhere from instantly cool if you use enough cold water and / or ice, to 10 hours or so! I had a batch that wouldn't cool once. I had it in ice water in the sink, and was stirring it constantly, it just wouldn't cool! I'm sure lots of bacteria got a head start in that batch!!

Then Im glad I grabbed a wort cooler then, the last thing I want is the bacteria...

Rusty
02-18-2005, 01:40 PM
It takes a couple months?


Yep...........I'll wait another month (when this batch is half way done, and I'll make another. That way I'll always have a batch ready to drink.

Rusty
02-18-2005, 01:43 PM
That grapefruit maddog sounds interesting too!




Here is my recipe if your interested. Makes one gallon batches.

1 large can (1 lb. 3 oz.) grapefruit sections in syrup
1 pint of pure white grape juice
2 lbs. white sugar
1 tsp. yeast nutrient
1 tsp. pectic enzyme
¼ to ½ tsp. tannin
water to make up 1 gallon
1 pkg white wine yeast
Put 1 quart water on to boil. Meanwhile, dump grapefruit sections and syrup in primary and crush with hands. Add sugar to boiling water and stir well until it is dissolved. Pour boiling water in primary. Cover and allow to cool to room temperature. Add all ingredients except yeast. Stir and cover. Add yeast the next day. Recover primary and stir daily for 5-7 days. Strain through nylon straining bag and squeeze well. Transfer liquid to a secondary and cap with an airlock. Rack after 30 days and again when wine clears. Stabilize and allow another 30 days. Bottle and enjoy immediately.

gliderider94
02-18-2005, 01:54 PM
I haven't followed this entire forum, so excuse me if this info has already been provided. Here's a link (http://brewery.org/) that may or moy not have been mentioned before. It's an awsome place to turn to once you have your basic technique down. It has HUNDREDS of recipe's in the "Cat's Meow" (http://brewery.org/brewery/cm3/CatsMeow3.html) and "Gambrimus's Mug" (http://brewery.org/brewery/gambmug/gambmug.shtml) recipe sections. There is also a pretty nifty page with a recipe calculation spread sheet (http://hbd.org/recipator/) and lots of other brewing related info and links. This site was developed over the past several years with help from a friend of mine named Pat Babcock who has been at the forefront of the homebrewing boom here in the Detroit area for years. Great site if you haven't heard of it before.

Slice
02-18-2005, 05:01 PM
Bear,

Thanks for that link. It's a real interesting site and bound to be of help.




Bill

gliderider94
02-18-2005, 05:11 PM
Anyone who has moved up to, and feels comfortable with all grain brewung and has what they feel is a robust process should check out the book "Designing Great Beers" by Ray Daniels (Brewer's Publications - Boulder Colarado IBSN 0-937381-50-0).

An awsome book for anyone ready to creat a beer of any style that is uniquely your own. It has become my bible for recipe formulation.

Tony
02-18-2005, 05:32 PM
4 days and counting until my stuff arrives!!!!!

LostLake
02-19-2005, 03:30 PM
Here I go again... On the heals of a successful batch, I have gathered the ingredients for my next batch...

No recipe. I found a deal on 5lbs of malt amber malt extract, grabbed an ounce of Saaz hops, and an ounce of Cascade. Here's my recipe...

Boil 6 gallons water with the 5lbs of Amber malt for 20 minutes,
add 1 oz of Cascade hops boil for 30 minutes,
add 1/2 oz Saaz hops and boil for 2 minutes.

Chill to 75 degrees and pitch Wyeast 1056 American Ale yeast.


What do you guys think? It has a lot of malt, should be a stronger beer... I also want more carbonation, so either I will add 1 1/2 cups of malt to prime (vs 1 cup last batch) or keg and force carbonate this batch. Maybe someone has a hops recommendation?? Or perhaps one of those fancy recipe programs can tell what if this recipe is any good.

Rusty
02-19-2005, 04:42 PM
Here I go again... On the heals of a successful batch, I have gathered the ingredients for my next batch...

No recipe. I found a deal on 5lbs of malt amber malt extract, grabbed an ounce of Saaz hops, and an ounce of Cascade. Here's my recipe...

Boil 6 gallons water with the 5lbs of Amber malt for 20 minutes,
add 1 oz of Cascade hops boil for 30 minutes,
add 1/2 oz Saaz hops and boil for 2 minutes.

Chill to 75 degrees and pitch Wyeast 1056 American Ale yeast.


What do you guys think? It has a lot of malt, should be a stronger beer... I also want more carbonation, so either I will add 1 1/2 cups of malt to prime (vs 1 cup last batch) or keg and force carbonate this batch. Maybe someone has a hops recommendation?? Or perhaps one of those fancy recipe programs can tell what if this recipe is any good.

Thats a lot of hops.........But it's a simple recipe that sounds like it will taste good. You going to brew this weekend?

Tony
02-19-2005, 07:16 PM
3 Days and counting until my stuff arrives!!!!

Rusty
02-19-2005, 07:19 PM
3 Days and counting until my stuff arrives!!!!

Do you know when (what date) your going to brew?

Make sure you allow yourself plenty of time. I was rushed for time on my first batch and found myself trying to cut corners. I think it's important to allow plenty of time. I've also found out that if you clean your equipment after your done brewing, as opposed to waiting till the next time you brew, it's easier to clean.

Tony
02-19-2005, 07:29 PM
3 Days and counting until my stuff arrives!!!!

Do you know when (what date) your going to brew?

Make sure you allow yourself plenty of time. I was rushed for time on my first batch and found myself trying to cut corners. I think it's important to allow plenty of time. I've also found out that if you clean your equipment after your done brewing, as opposed to waiting till the next time you brew, it's easier to clean.

I will get everything Feb 22, and will go over everything in the kit, get familiar with all my equipment and steps, and probably lay everything out for cleaning and sterilizing for the next day. So Feb 23 will be my start day, and I will photo catalog everything.

By the way, I opted for the 1 liter Flip Top bottles for my kit, anyone use them before or is everyone capping regular bottles?

Rusty
02-19-2005, 07:35 PM
By the way, I opted for the 1 liter Flip Top bottles for my kit, anyone use them before or is everyone capping regular bottles?

I did it the hard but fun way. I started dinking a lot of beer. And saving the bottles, cleaning them out as I drank. I drank 3-cases of beer in 3 weeks so I would have enough bottles. Little did I know that I could have just purchased the bottles for a hell of a lot less than what I paid. After bottling my fist batch, I ended up with 46 12oz bottles. I'd rather have the bottles that you purchased. Much easier and cheaper.

Tony
02-19-2005, 07:39 PM
I did it the hard but fun way. I started dinking a lot of beer. And saving the bottles, cleaning them out as I drank. I drank 3-cases of beer in 3 weeks so I would have enough bottles. Little did I know that I could have just purchased the bottles for a hell of a lot less than what I paid. After bottling my fist batch, I ended up with 46 12oz bottles. I'd rather have the bottles that you purchased. Much easier and cheaper.

Cool, I figured they would be easy to use, plus they were the larger sized ones, and since Im the only one in my house who will be drinking my beer (no one else likes beer) I figured the larger bottles would work for me.

Slice
02-19-2005, 08:04 PM
Tony,

I bought 2 cases of those same bottles. I've also saved some Becks and Grolsh bottles over the last 3 or 4 months.

I like the idea of the larger bottles for ease and simplicity of bottling.

Besides, who can just drink one beer? :lol: B)

I'm going to do my first ever batch this weekend. To say the least, I'm curious to see how it turns out.

Rusty
02-19-2005, 08:33 PM
Tony,

I bought 2 cases of those same bottles. I've also saved some Becks and Grolsh bottles over the last 3 or 4 months.

I like the idea of the larger bottles for ease and simplicity of bottling.

Besides, who can just drink one beer? :lol: B)

I'm going to do my first ever batch this weekend. To say the least, I'm curious to see how it turns out.

If you get the chance, take some pictures and make sure you let us know how it went.

Tony
02-19-2005, 10:50 PM
Tony,

I bought 2 cases of those same bottles. I've also saved some Becks and Grolsh bottles over the last 3 or 4 months.

I like the idea of the larger bottles for ease and simplicity of bottling.

True, I figured it would make things much easier that way.


Besides, who can just drink one beer? :lol: B)

Excactly!!!!!!!

LostLake
02-19-2005, 11:59 PM
I have 8 - 32oz Grolsh bottles (the ceramic top with rubber washer that snaps down are called Grolsh bottles) and I bought 12 of the 16oz cap bottles, and I have maybe 30 16oz Grolsh bottles. I was thinking of stopping by the liquor store and getting 2 cases of fresh-returned returnables to clean and use.

Personally, I like capping. I have two different cappers and they both work great. Putting the rubber washers on the Grolsh caps kinda sucks, but they work nice too.

I'm sucking another home brew now, had one an hour ago, I'm telling my wife I need to get the bottles empty!!! They taste better as they age, but they'll never make it to their two week birthday!!

I'm cooking a batch tonight. They only thing is I may bitter with the Saaz for 60 minutes, then throw 1/2oz of Cascade in 5 minutes from the end for aroma. Gonna start in a few minutes here....

Rusty
02-20-2005, 12:03 AM
I'm cooking a batch tonight. They only thing is I may bitter with the Saaz for 60 minutes, then throw 1/2oz of Cascade in 5 minutes from the end for aroma. Gonna start in a few minutes here....


God wants us to be happy, that's why he invented beer. :D

LostLake
02-20-2005, 02:48 AM
Update: 8:45pm Central

Have the wort boiling at 212F and added 1 oz of Cascade at the start. Cascade smell nasty and have a higher IBU so I chucked them in right away. The Saaz smell kinda sweet, I'll use them for aroma...

I may carbonate with honey.. I'm thinking silly now, the dead soldiers number 6 pint bottles and one liter bottle strong, and I have another hour of brewing to go!!! :P

Rusty
02-20-2005, 04:01 AM
Update: 8:45pm Central
I may carbonate with honey.. I'm thinking silly now, the dead soldiers number 6 pint bottles and one liter bottle strong, and I have another hour of brewing to go!!! :P

Funny, I had that same problem when I was brewing. The dead numbers start rising as the boil keeps rolloing.

Be careful with that honey. It's hard to measure.

tradrockrat
02-20-2005, 05:41 AM
I'm cooking a batch tonight. They only thing is I may bitter with the Saaz for 60 minutes, then throw 1/2oz of Cascade in 5 minutes from the end for aroma. Gonna start in a few minutes here....


God wants us to be happy, that's why he invented beer. :D


God invented Whiskey to keep the Irish from taking over the world. He invented beer to say, "I'm sorry".

LostLake
02-20-2005, 03:31 PM
Dateline Sunday 9:30 am...

I must apologize for the spelling and gramatical errors evident in my last post... It was the Lost Lake Lager...

No bubbling yet, although the airlock is carbonated. There are a couple more of the liter bottles empty on the kitchen counter this morning. No, this batch will not last very long. B)

I feel excellent today. That's one good thing about fresh real beer! :P

Tony
02-20-2005, 10:04 PM
2 Days and counting!!!!!

LostLake
02-20-2005, 11:02 PM
Dateline Sunday, 5pm:

The brew bucket has been happily bubbling along since I got back from church. It's sure to be another great batch.

By the way, did you guys notice I just put my bottles in the dishwasher for cleaning and sterilizing? I have a heated dry cycle and another website said that will sterilize them well enough. So far so good, it's really easy! ;)

Rusty
02-21-2005, 12:50 AM
Dateline Sunday, 5pm:

By the way, did you guys notice I just put my bottles in the dishwasher for cleaning and sterilizing? I have a heated dry cycle and another website said that will sterilize them well enough. So far so good, it's really easy! ;)

Thats all I ever do. I just bottled my second batch today.

I had a little mis hap. I sterilize with bleach. I had a 5 gal. bottling bucket full of bleach water that leaked out all over the place while I was on the phone. My wife is not happy that It leaked into the front room on the cream colored burber carpet. :angry: :lol:

Tony
02-21-2005, 02:31 AM
Dateline Sunday, 5pm:
By the way, did you guys notice I just put my bottles in the dishwasher for cleaning and sterilizing? I have a heated dry cycle and another website said that will sterilize them well enough. So far so good, it's really easy! ;)

So as long as you empty the bottles when you open them, you can just use the dishwasher?

Rusty....sorry about the carpet mishap man....I feel your pain. (LOL...or the pain your wife is giving you ^_^ )

Tony
02-21-2005, 03:32 PM
Well, I got my Wort Chiller today...now just waiting on the rest. 1 Day left!

Slice
02-21-2005, 03:57 PM
Well, I made the first batch yesterday afternoon. I couldn't take any pics, the daughter took off with the digi camera.

I chose the American Light to start with hoping it will be light enough for the wife. She is a light beer drinker and can't get along with heavy beers.

My brew pot is a big stainless steel unit that comes from a turkey deep fyer that I have never used. It worked well and is a snap to clean up.

All went well and the process was finished at 9:30 PM.

The fermenting bucket is right at 69 deg. and is bubbling along like a coffee pot percolates.

Three things I learned:

Don't drop the hydrometer. It breaks. :angry:

Cook my stuff on the turkey cooker in the garage. The family isn't too thrilled with the smell though I thought it had a pleasant aroma.

I need a wort chiller. That is problematic without one. Wort doesn't chill very fast even in 31 deg. outside temps.

All in all, I think it went very well for a first time effort. I'll keep y'all posted as it progresses.





:) :)

Rusty
02-21-2005, 04:03 PM
Well, I made the first batch yesterday afternoon. I couldn't take any pics, the daughter took off with the digi camera.

I chose the American Light to start with hoping it will be light enough for the wife. She is a light beer drinker and can't get along with heavy beers.

Same thing at my house.



My brew pot is a big stainless steel unit that comes from a turkey deep fyer that I have never used. It worked well and is a snap to clean up.

All went well and the process was finished at 9:30 PM.
That is good. Bet you were glad you were finished early enough



The fermenting bucket is right at 69 deg. and is bubbling along like a coffee pot percolates.
another plus



Three things I learned:

Don't drop the hydrometer. It breaks. :angry:
have not done that one YET.



Cook my stuff on the turkey cooker in the garage. The family isn't too thrilled with the smell though I thought it had a pleasant aroma.

Same at my house also. But hell, it's my house to.



I need a wort chiller. That is problematic without one. Wort doesn't chill very fast even in 31 deg. outside temps.

I found that one out the hard way also.



All in all, I think it went very well for a first time effort. I'll keep y'all posted as it progresses.





:) :)

I'm glad to hear that all went well. What type of yeast did you use in that american light?

Slice
02-21-2005, 04:14 PM
Rusty,

I have no idea what yeast it is. It came with the kit and the package is gone with the trash.

I suppose I'll get better about knowing that stuff as I gain experience.

I hope this stuff turns out good, it's actually kind of fun doing it.

How many of you guys couldn't stop going and looking at the fermenter on your first batch? Something about watching it bubble away that is fascinating....

B)

Rusty
02-21-2005, 04:18 PM
Rusty,

I have no idea what yeast it is. It came with the kit and the package is gone with the trash.
I was just wondering. The yeast packet that came in my American lite kit was unmarked in a tin foil pouch. It was good yeast and had good attenuation. (sp)



I suppose I'll get better about knowing that stuff as I gain experience.

I hope this stuff turns out good, it's actually kind of fun doing it.

How many of you guys couldn't stop going and looking at the fermenter on your first batch? Something about watching it bubble away that is fascinating....

B)

Watching the air-lock is one of my favorite past times. Go grab a cold beer and just watch it. No one will bother you and it's quite. :rolleyes:

tradrockrat
02-21-2005, 08:32 PM
Just to get another post, I thought I'd let you know that my brother made a 5 gallon batch yesterday. Half of it he made into a Scotch Ale (my favorite!) and to the other half he added a Belgian yeast - so God knows what that's going to be. Said the weather in CO. was nice enough to do it outside...bastard. I'll let you know how it tastes if I get a chance to get out his way.



Have you guys thought about a brew swap? You know, sending a bottle to one another? I know that there are laws about that sort of thing, but a single bottle in a cardboard tube marked fragile...

HeadDoc
02-21-2005, 08:55 PM
didn't brew yesterday...to busy riding B) . Did pull a few pints off the ole keg that evening as I smoked a La Flor Dominicana #5 and sat outside admiring my bike.

heres my staple (session beer) it's an all grain recipe....

ingredients

Wyeast 1056 American Ale yeast
1.5 oz Cascade whole hops (picked from my hopyard)
1 oz Hallertau

7 lbs 2 row pale ale malt
1 lb 40 L crystal malt
.5 lb wheat malt
.5 lb roasted barley
1 lb cara pils malt

directions
crush in Scmiddling malt mill (Made in USA)

( I heat 3-3.5 gallons to strike temp 162 degrees f and add the grist while stirring) drunks drink a pint or two while getting ready

single step infusion mash at 152 degrees F for 2 hours or till I get ready to boil. I warm my oven at 150 degrees and shut it off and put my grain pot into the oven and leave it while I do other stuff.

drink another pint <_<

heat 5 gallons H2O and sparge until gone

drink a pint :blink2:

boil for one hour more or less

drink a pint and smoke a cigar groucho

chill with copper wort chiller

1 oz cascade hops at start of boil
.5 oz cascade in last 5 minutes of boil

dry hop with Hallertau plug... IN SECONDARY

rack to keg and put in dedicated beer firdge overnight. force carbonate to about 14 psi

leave alone in fridge for 2-3 weeks
ready to drink

Rusty
02-21-2005, 09:00 PM
rack to keg and put in dedicated beer firdge overnight. force carbonate to about 14 psi

leave alone in fridge for 2-3 weeks
ready to drink

Damn that sounds good.

I'm serious. I want to head that way this summer and watch/help you brew a batch. I may learn a thing or three.

HeadDoc
02-21-2005, 09:05 PM
oh yeah here's a force carbonation tip for you keggers.

I use pin lock fittings (Coke) but this works with ball lock too. I have the removable fittings on my beer and regulator hoses. (remove each from the hoses with a crescent of appropriate wrench)

when you force carbonate SWITCH the "gas in" fitting on your regulator hose with the "beer out" fitting. So now you have your "beer out" fitting on your regualtor hose. turn on the CO2 and attach to the beer out fitting onto the keg. Now your gas goes all the way down the dip tube to the bottom of the keg and bubbles back to the top throuogh all of the beer. It will saturate your beer to your target psi much faster.

When it reaches pressure and you don't hear it "groan" anymore while you shake the keg I always increase the pressure to 20 psi an shake it a couple of times and then take off your hose.

groucho

HeadDoc
02-21-2005, 09:07 PM
rack to keg and put in dedicated beer firdge overnight. force carbonate to about 14 psi

leave alone in fridge for 2-3 weeks
ready to drink

Damn that sounds good.

I'm serious. I want to head that way this summer and watch/help you brew a batch. I may learn a thing or three.

You got it R...and I wanna see that new Bike!

Slice
02-21-2005, 09:11 PM
didn't brew yesterday...to busy riding B) . Did pull a few pints off the ole keg that evening as I smoked a La Flor Dominicana #5 and sat outside admiring my bike.

heres my staple (session beer) it's an all grain recipe....

ingredients

Wyeast 1056 American Ale yeast
1.5 oz Cascade whole hops (picked from my hopyard)
1 oz Hallertau

7 lbs 2 row pale ale malt
1 lb 40 L crystal malt
.5 lb wheat malt
.5 lb roasted barley
1 lb cara pils malt

directions
crush in Scmiddling malt mill (Made in USA)

( I heat 3-3.5 gallons to strike temp 162 degrees f and add the grist while stirring) drunks drink a pint or two while getting ready

single step infusion mash at 152 degrees F for 2 hours or till I get ready to boil. I warm my oven at 150 degrees and shut it off and put my grain pot into the oven and leave it while I do other stuff.

drink another pint <_<

heat 5 gallons H2O and sparge until gone

drink a pint :blink2:

boil for one hour more or less

drink a pint and smoke a cigar groucho

chill with copper wort chiller

1 oz cascade hops at start of boil
.5 oz cascade in last 5 minutes of boil

dry hop with Hallertau plug... IN SECONDARY

rack to keg and put in dedicated beer firdge overnight. force carbonate to about 14 psi

leave alone in fridge for 2-3 weeks
ready to drink


Ya know.....I have no idea what you just said, but I hope to get there one day......


:wacko: :lol: ;) ;) ;)

HeadDoc
02-22-2005, 12:53 AM
didn't brew yesterday...to busy riding B) . Did pull a few pints off the ole keg that evening as I smoked a La Flor Dominicana #5 and sat outside admiring my bike.

heres my staple (session beer) it's an all grain recipe....

ingredients

Wyeast 1056 American Ale yeast
1.5 oz Cascade whole hops (picked from my hopyard)
1 oz Hallertau

7 lbs 2 row pale ale malt
1 lb 40 L crystal malt
.5 lb wheat malt
.5 lb roasted barley
1 lb cara pils malt

directions
crush in Scmiddling malt mill (Made in USA)

( I heat 3-3.5 gallons to strike temp 162 degrees f and add the grist while stirring) drunks drink a pint or two while getting ready

single step infusion mash at 152 degrees F for 2 hours or till I get ready to boil. I warm my oven at 150 degrees and shut it off and put my grain pot into the oven and leave it while I do other stuff.

drink another pint <_<

heat 5 gallons H2O and sparge until gone

drink a pint :blink2:

boil for one hour more or less

drink a pint and smoke a cigar groucho

chill with copper wort chiller

1 oz cascade hops at start of boil
.5 oz cascade in last 5 minutes of boil

dry hop with Hallertau plug... IN SECONDARY

rack to keg and put in dedicated beer firdge overnight. force carbonate to about 14 psi

leave alone in fridge for 2-3 weeks
ready to drink


Ya know.....I have no idea what you just said, but I hope to get there one day......


:wacko: :lol: ;) ;) ;)

hey Slice ....you'll be there quicker than you think

LostLake
02-22-2005, 03:06 AM
Hey Headdoc;

When you force, do you just add 20lbs and remove the CO2 tank?

I used to turn up the pressure to 30 - 40 psi and shake the beJesus out of the tank for about 15 minutes, then I would turn the pressure down to 12 pounds or so and drink away. I wouldn't wait at all (mistake?), and I always fight with fluctuating carbonation. If I leave the pressure at 12 or 15 pounds for a week the beer gets super foamy, if I leave it at 6 - 8 pounds it goes flat and won't come out of the keg at that low pressure. So then I frogged with boosting it up to dispense, then turning it down to sit, and what a pain! I never knew how it would taste week to week.

What's the secret? I'm going to have to keg a batch here pretty soon. In fact (and I can hear the groans from you guys now) I built this house 7 years ago when I was brewing regularily, and set my keg fridge in the basement right below the kitchen. The pocelain sink has an extra hole in it for a ---- yes--- a TAPPER!! :P I calculated the 8 foot line to the tap will only hold about an ounce or two of beer, much shorter than a regular bar's tap lines. And where is a better place to tap a beer than right there at the sink?

HeadDoc
02-22-2005, 03:56 PM
Hey Headdoc;

When you force, do you just add 20lbs and remove the CO2 tank?

I used to turn up the pressure to 30 - 40 psi and shake the beJesus out of the tank for about 15 minutes, then I would turn the pressure down to 12 pounds or so and drink away. I wouldn't wait at all (mistake?), and I always fight with fluctuating carbonation. If I leave the pressure at 12 or 15 pounds for a week the beer gets super foamy, if I leave it at 6 - 8 pounds it goes flat and won't come out of the keg at that low pressure. So then I frogged with boosting it up to dispense, then turning it down to sit, and what a pain! I never knew how it would taste week to week.

What's the secret? I'm going to have to keg a batch here pretty soon. In fact (and I can hear the groans from you guys now) I built this house 7 years ago when I was brewing regularily, and set my keg fridge in the basement right below the kitchen. The pocelain sink has an extra hole in it for a ---- yes--- a TAPPER!! :P I calculated the 8 foot line to the tap will only hold about an ounce or two of beer, much shorter than a regular bar's tap lines. And where is a better place to tap a beer than right there at the sink?

Good question LL. Heres my take on achieveing consistent carbonation. First rack beer into keg and then purge the head space out...don't carbonate yet because its room temp. CO2 goes into solution in a cold liquid easier than a warm one. Think about spewing a hot beer everywhere. So Put the keg into a fridge overnight so that you know what temp it is. I usually get mine to about 45-48 degrees. The next day force carbonate for about 10-15 minutes by shaking back and forth. rocking around etc. I suggest 12-16 lbs but there are charts in most of the books that crosstab temperature and desired carbonation level to let you know exactly how many psi to use while carbonating. I just don't ever udse the book anymore cause I know what I like. When you start to carbonate the beer you will hear a groaning and bubbling sound as the gas goes into the keg, especially if you run the gas in through the beer out fitting. when it stops "groaning" after about 10 minutes it usually means the beer is saturated to 12-14 psi, perfect for drinkin'. I just top it at 20-25 psi right before I take the gas hose off. I do this because I put the keg back in the fridge and leave it.so ifthe psi drops as more co2 goes into solution over the next week or so while its sitting, the extra psi compensates.

Now, the important shit. The first pint usually is foamy. So get a pitcher out.... :P or.....release pressure on the keg through the saftey valve or press the pin on the gas in fitting on the keg. then set your regulator to 6 lbs for dispensing.....Use at least a 3.5 to 4 foot tap hose and go with as narrow an internal diameter as you can on the hose. this helps stop foaming too. When you pour (i'm assuming your using a cobra head..the black plastic cheapos) open the cobra all the way or it will foam and 45 degree you pint glass. It will settle down over a day or two after you tap the keg.....but hey its all good! foamy or not :lol:

gliderider94
02-22-2005, 04:21 PM
Here I go again... On the heals of a successful batch, I have gathered the ingredients for my next batch...

No recipe. I found a deal on 5lbs of malt amber malt extract, grabbed an ounce of Saaz hops, and an ounce of Cascade. Here's my recipe...

Boil 6 gallons water with the 5lbs of Amber malt for 20 minutes,
add 1 oz of Cascade hops boil for 30 minutes,
add 1/2 oz Saaz hops and boil for 2 minutes.

Chill to 75 degrees and pitch Wyeast 1056 American Ale yeast.


What do you guys think? It has a lot of malt, should be a stronger beer... I also want more carbonation, so either I will add 1 1/2 cups of malt to prime (vs 1 cup last batch) or keg and force carbonate this batch. Maybe someone has a hops recommendation?? Or perhaps one of those fancy recipe programs can tell what if this recipe is any good.

I have done countless beers like this. I call them "kitchen sink" beers or "fridge cleaners". Often I have a bunch of stuff left over from a season of brewing and just chuck it all in a pot to get rid of it. The biggest problem I have is that quite often the beers turn out really good, but I couldn't re-produce them if my life depended on it. Lots of fun though.

Tony
02-22-2005, 04:30 PM
YES!!! My stuff arrived today!!!!!

Ive been through everything frontwards and back, checked everything and am ready to start cleaning and sterilizing.

The cool part is the book that came with the kit states that Ale is a more forgiving beer to brew...

Can anyone else confirm that?

HeadDoc
02-22-2005, 07:33 PM
YES!!! My stuff arrived today!!!!!

Ive been through everything frontwards and back, checked everything and am ready to start cleaning and sterilizing.

The cool part is the book that came with the kit states that Ale is a more forgiving beer to brew...

Can anyone else confirm that?

its all true! B) follow the basic directions, cool your boil off as fast as ya can...and try and keep the fermenter between 60-70 degrees. you'll like the outcome! :lol:

let us know how it goes.

Tony
02-22-2005, 11:09 PM
its all true! B) follow the basic directions, cool your boil off as fast as ya can...and try and keep the fermenter between 60-70 degrees. you'll like the outcome! :lol:

let us know how it goes.

Cool, thanks for the confirmation. im going to take some pics as I go along.

LostLake
02-22-2005, 11:45 PM
No I don't use a cobra head, I have a chrome tapper, a regular brass bodied chrome plated tap like a bar has. And yes I have to open it all the way. Weiss beers are the fussiest to tap, and I run a lot of those through it!

So Headdoc, you say you carbonate at around 15 lbs when the beer is chilled, then run her up to 20 psi and pull the hose off? That I never did, I would carbonate and then start to drink. I will let it sit for a while. And yes, I have a short hose... :wub:

I need a smaller hose diameter or it needs to be longer, that way I can run a higher psi and not have the beer go flat in the keg while it sits. But I know 6 lbs would flatten my beer out, I use to like to leave it at 12 or so, pretty much the same as the beer is carbonated (makes sense hey? No more in or out!), so longer or skinnier hose is the answer to that.....

Thanks for all the help!! B)

LostLake
02-22-2005, 11:58 PM
its all true! B) follow the basic directions, cool your boil off as fast as ya can...and try and keep the fermenter between 60-70 degrees. you'll like the outcome! :lol:

let us know how it goes.

Cool, thanks for the confirmation. im going to take some pics as I go along.


Just keep it clean Tony!! Don't stir with a spoon that's not sterile! I wouldn't rinse with unsterile water either, I use No-Rinse One Step, or Idophor, and I'd rather have a touch of that in the beer than some bacteria that loves my beer as much as I do.

If you need a wort chiller, do what I did... buy a 50' piece of soft copper from the local Fleet Farm or Lowes or whatever you have by you, coil that bad boy around something a bit smaller than your kettle, (I used a 5 gallon bucket because my kettle is pretty big) then slide a piece of clear hose on the two ends and connect garden hose fittings to the hose ends. Run a hose from your spigot to the chiller, then a drain line out the door. Turn on the water and she'll cool down 5 gallons in a few minutes.

Cost?

50' of copper tubing $20
2' hose $ 1
Hose ends $2
Hose clamps $2

Just drop the chiller in the boiling wort 10 minutes or so before the end of the boil to sterilize it. And the end of the boil, turn on the water and chill. Turn off the water at 72 degrees or so and pull out the chiller. Rinse the chiller good to get rid of any malt or hops and store it in the kettle for the next time.

If you don't use a chiller, you can add sterile water to the wort by boiling only two gallons and adding three sterile gallons at the end of the boil. If that's not cool enough, set the kettle in an ice bath in the sink. The bad part is you have to keep stirring it or the ouside will be 50 and the interior will be 90, and stirring adds more chances of contamination etc etc etc.

Chillers are super nice!!!! ;)

Slice
02-23-2005, 01:36 AM
Lostlake,

Thanks for the chiller tutorial. I need one bad.

Another question:

How long does the fermentation usually take for an American Light type of beer? Mine is bubbling at 69 deg. right now and It was started Sunday night. Got up Monday to a fast perc. It has now slowed somewhat but is still consistenetly bubbling.

Knowing my luck it will be ready to bottle on Thursday night when I have to be out that evening on business. <_<

How long can it sit before it MUST be racked?

Also, do you boil the water that has to be added to sterilize? I just used tap water but think that must run big bacteria risk.

Thanks for all of you guys being willing to help!

Tony
02-23-2005, 01:46 AM
Cool LL, thanks for the info. i picked up a chiller the other day, so ive got that covered.

I may start tonight...

LostLake
02-23-2005, 02:41 AM
Lostlake,

Thanks for the chiller tutorial. I need one bad.

Another question:

How long does the fermentation usually take for an American Light type of beer? Mine is bubbling at 69 deg. right now and It was started Sunday night. Got up Monday to a fast perc. It has now slowed somewhat but is still consistenetly bubbling.

Knowing my luck it will be ready to bottle on Thursday night when I have to be out that evening on business. <_<

How long can it sit before it MUST be racked?

Also, do you boil the water that has to be added to sterilize? I just used tap water but think that must run big bacteria risk.

Thanks for all of you guys being willing to help!

Fermenting will take 5 - 10 days. The bubbles will slow to zero, never try to bottle when you get more than one bubble every two minutes. The yeast is still eating sugar, and you want that sugar gone so you can accurately add the proper carbonation sugar and not have exploding bottles, foaming beers, or flat beer.

You can leave it sit a long time in the fermenter, in fact some beers sit for months. A glass carboy is more airtight for these long fermentation times, so if you have your beer in a plastic pail you won't want to leave it in there while you spend three weeks in Europe.

Yes, the water you add should be bug-free. I learned that the hard way. If you get a fast start to the yeast, it will kill off the other bacteria in the water and any incidental bacteria that may get into the beer. Now the bugs in your water may not do much by way of harm, or they may give you a bit of vinegar taste to the beer. If you are using city water it is probably chlorinated and pretty safe.

Recap: Ferment 5-10 days depending on how the yeast is doing and the temperature.
Rack: When you can, but don't delay if in plastic.
Water added: MUST be sterile to assure good results. Anything less is a crap shoot. ( I boil the whole 5 gallons now)

Hey! Let's see pics and hear more play by play's.... Maybe we can swap some bottles.... I was in a couple of beer clubs that shipped beer accross the country, it must be legal to do..... B)

Slice
02-23-2005, 02:53 AM
LL,

Thanks for the info. that helps more than you know.

I'd be happy to drink your beer, but I think I'll wait to see if the stuff I make is even drinkable before I send any out! LOL

Tony
02-23-2005, 08:26 AM
Okay folks...Its done. I busted out the ole lobster pot and got to brewing. Everything worked out great, and I had fun doing it. Kind of straight forward, but Im sure once I change over to grains and such, things may change a bit.

LOL..I almost forgot to take pictures, and ended up getting it after my first boil and the malts were added. Anyway...here we go.

http://www.harleychatgroup.com/modules/coppermine/albums/userpics/10955/normal_1%20-%20Cream%20Ale%20Kit.jpg
Cream Ale Kit

Tony
02-23-2005, 08:30 AM
This was the first boil. My pot was great for brewing, and heated up nicely. This was after my 1st boil. When my water boiled, I turned off the heat and added the malt syrup, stirred it until it blended it, then added the dry malt. Once it was disolved, the heat was turned back on.
http://www.harleychatgroup.com/modules/coppermine/albums/userpics/10955/normal_6%20-%201st%20Boil.jpg

Tony
02-23-2005, 08:33 AM
Here is the wort, ready to cool. I added the bittering hops 30 minutes after adding the malts, then added the finishing hops around 15 minutes later. Smelling good for sure now. I should have used a flash, as the picture color is off a bit.
http://www.harleychatgroup.com/modules/coppermine/albums/userpics/10955/normal_7%20-%20Ready%20To%20Cool.jpg

Tony
02-23-2005, 08:36 AM
Here is my wort chiller. I have to say, this damn thing worked great. It was the perfect height for my pot, and cooled my wort down in less than 15 minutes.
http://www.harleychatgroup.com/modules/coppermine/albums/userpics/10955/normal_8%20-%20Wort%20Cooler.jpg

Tony
02-23-2005, 08:38 AM
Here it is before the lid goes on. Again, I shoud have used the flash to get the color a little better, but you get the basic idea of its color.
http://www.harleychatgroup.com/modules/coppermine/albums/userpics/10955/normal_9%20-%20Color.jpg

Tony
02-23-2005, 08:41 AM
Well, the fun parts over. Yeast pitched, and now its in the fermenting bucket, with the lid on, airlock primed and all set. Now to wait for fermentation to start. The only thing I didnt take a picture of was my yeast, but everyone know what that looks like...lol
http://www.harleychatgroup.com/modules/coppermine/albums/userpics/10955/normal_Sealed%20and%20Fermenting.jpg

Rusty
02-23-2005, 01:34 PM
Lostlake,


How long does the fermentation usually take for an American Light type of beer? Mine is bubbling at 69 deg. right now and It was started Sunday night. Got up Monday to a fast perc. It has now slowed somewhat but is still consistenetly bubbling.

Knowing my luck it will be ready to bottle on Thursday night when I have to be out that evening on business. <_<

My american lite only took 5 days.



How long can it sit before it MUST be racked?


Don't worry, It can sit in the primary for around 3-4 weeks before any autolysis starts.



Also, do you boil the water that has to be added to sterilize? I just used tap water but think that must run big bacteria risk.

Thanks for all of you guys being willing to help!

I never have boiled my additional water but some people will tell you that you should do full boils. If you were careful with your sterilization I'm sure you will be fine. I'm finding out that it takes a lot to infect a batch of beer.

Slice
02-23-2005, 03:24 PM
Tony,

Great pics! Thanks for taking them.

Rusty,

Thanks for the info.

The first day of fermenting the airlock was very busy. It's now down to a bubble every 4 to 5 seconds. It has slowed considerably.

It'll be interesting to see how long it takes.

UltraHog
02-23-2005, 03:32 PM
I wish I could do that. Oh well--off to the ABC Store I go.

HeadDoc
02-23-2005, 03:34 PM
Tony Great Job...everything looks great congrats...now get your second set of materials ready so that when you rack your first batch to the secondary you can add a new batch right into your primary on top of all that yeast that will be left! B)

Tony
02-23-2005, 07:00 PM
Tony Great Job...everything looks great congrats


Thanks



...now get your second set of materials ready so that when you rack your first batch to the secondary you can add a new batch right into your primary on top of all that yeast that will be left! B)

Seriously?

Tony
02-23-2005, 07:46 PM
Okay, I found a local brewing supply house :D and will be trying different types of beers now. First, has anyone ever made German Wheat Beer? It sounds good from its description.

Second, whats everyones favorite beer they have brewed?

Tony
02-24-2005, 12:15 AM
Update...bubbles in the air lock started this morning around 11am, and were 1 bubble every 10 seconds. Now, at 7pm, its 1 bubble every 2 seconds. Seems like its coming along good :)

LostLake
02-24-2005, 12:44 AM
Yeh Tony I brewed a wheat, you just use wheat malt, I used wheat DME and 3 or 4 lbs of wheat grain, and if I remember, it takes Cascade hops to get that citrusy taste. Mine turned out fantastic!!

My favorite beer was a mistake, a part ale, part porter kind of thing with some very dark malt and some amber malt with just a pound of light grain, and a long boil... way too much hops I thought, but I had like 14 pounds of malt in the wort! That sucker boiled like a steam engine for days and days.... Even overflowed the airlock and on the floor..... I tried it again but could never get that beer to come out anywhere close.

The wheat was a close second... but I love wheat beer in the summer.....

Tony
02-24-2005, 12:53 AM
Cool info on the Wheat beer. It sounds like it would be a great tasting beer for sure. Even though its not summer ;) Im going to do that one next.

Tony
02-25-2005, 11:28 PM
I visited a local brew store (beer-wine.com) and am in heaven. they have everything and anything needed, plus all kinds of their own recipies, and full stock of all ingredients. I talked with the owner awhile and got some great info on two stage vs single stage brewing, plus all grain brewing as well. I picked up another single stage malt kit, "Wheat" beer like I said, and as soon as my first batch is bottled, Im gonna brew the wheat. But, Im going to pick up a carboy and jump into two stage brewing and get into some of those special recipies. Plus, I want to learn how to make my own recipies.

Update on mine, the bubbles hve slowed down a bit, and if all goes as planned, Mondy should be bottling day.

tradrockrat
02-26-2005, 12:28 AM
I only pop in to this thread on occasion cause I'm a wanna-be, and have too many hobbies as it is, but are you guys all keeping a beer bible, and a bar-chive? I hear alot of stories about that one great beer that got away - it happened to my brother once on a barleywine that blew the doors off of the brewclubs' monthly meeting. Everybody wanted the recipe, but...he didn't have one! He now has a bible of every beer recipe he's ever made, and when he hits a good barleywine, wine or meade, one or two bottles go into his downstairs "bar-chive" to savor at a much later date.

PS - the best beer HE ever made (to sort of answer the question made a few posts ago) was a Scotch Ale that is simply the best scotch ale ever made, and I've tried dozens of brands, from McEwans to Red Seal.

Tony
02-26-2005, 12:34 AM
... but are you guys all keeping a beer bible, and a bar-chive?

Right now, Im only doing singe stage kits, which have all the ingredients measured out and pre-packaged. Its pretty straight forward and no archive is needed. But, Im planning on one more batch of single stage, then move into two stage, and then the log book will start.

The guy at my local brew supply is going to hook me up with recipies and ideas. I cant wait.

Slice
02-26-2005, 01:01 AM
Update on my first batch:

The yeast was pitched last Sunday nite.

It's still bubling, but very slowly now. Maybe one a minute.

I'm hoping it quits entirely so I can bottle this weekend. Sure would be convenient.

I went to a local brew supply house today to buy a replacement hydometer. I also picked up another ingredient kit for a brown ale that is supposed to be somewhat close to Dos Equis Brown.

I don't believe I'll be going back to this shop because, unlike the shop that Tony was in, the owner of this one is a bit of a jerk.

He had no time to talk with a complete newbie and I was the only person in there.

Oh well, there's others.

Tony
02-26-2005, 01:36 AM
I don't believe I'll be going back to this shop because, unlike the shop that Tony was in, the owner of this one is a bit of a jerk.

He had no time to talk with a complete newbie and I was the only person in there.

Oh well, there's others.

Damn that sucks...Dig this, the place I went to is basically an internet company, selling out of a warehouse in an executive office park. As soon as I walked in, they showed me where to go to the selling area. The same area they pull products from to ship nation wide. The owner and I got into a cool conversation about all forms of brewing, offered me his card and told him to call anytime for help or products.

Best of luck finding another brew shop and please keep us up to date on your brew!!!!

Slice
02-26-2005, 01:43 AM
Tony,

I'll for sure do that.

Do you have a link to their webpage?

Tony
02-26-2005, 01:46 AM
Sure, gladly, here:Beer and Wine Hobby (http://www.beer-wine.com/)

Slice
02-26-2005, 02:04 AM
Thanks Tony, great site!

They have a couple of ingredient kits i want to try.

I'd like to be able to replicate a canadian like Molson or Moosehead and they have one I'll try.

Tony
02-26-2005, 02:33 AM
Cool...


LOL...Big Kids in Big Candy Stores!!!!

LostLake
02-26-2005, 02:41 PM
Hey Tony, Trad's idea of a bar-chive is right on. I started mine right after that flop of trying to recreate the awesome brew I had. Even with a kit, letting a boil go longer or pitching yeast at a different time makes a world of difference!

I would think the amount of time you keep the beer in the primary before transferring to the carboy makes a difference because you leave behind most of the hops in the bucket when you transfer. Hmmm, I never write that down, and you don't see it in recipes either.... Maybe Headdoc knows if that makes a difference...

Force carbonating tastes different than sugar priming, and sugar priming tastes different than malt or honey priming. Once you do a couple, you'll really appreciate how these big breweries can get their beer to taste the same every time. And you'll notice slight chages in the mass produced beer as your taste buds refine to catch this stuff. If you drink at microbreweries, like the ones that produce a couple hundred barrels a year and sell food in the front type, you will taste a lot of difference between batches.

We homebrewers don't have microprocessor controlled heating and flow valves, we have egg timers and gas stoves. Making two batches alike is pretty tough without paying attention to the little details.

Luckily, these slight changes can be a good thing!!

Slice
02-26-2005, 02:53 PM
I would think the amount of time you keep the beer in the primary before transferring to the carboy makes a difference because you leave behind most of the hops in the bucket when you transfer.

Luckily, these slight changes can be a good thing!!

Is it better to leave in the primary for an extra day or two, or bottle right away?

I am at that stage now.

Tony
02-26-2005, 04:47 PM
Hey Tony, Trad's idea of a bar-chive is right on. I started mine right after that flop of trying to recreate the awesome brew I had. Even with a kit, letting a boil go longer or pitching yeast at a different time makes a world of difference!

Damn, I never thought about that type of things, but thats a good idea for sure. Im gad since mine was my first batch ever, I remembr all the times of the boils and when everything was added.


I would think the amount of time you keep the beer in the primary before transferring to the carboy makes a difference because you leave behind most of the hops in the bucket when you transfer.

Makes complete sense to me. Question...I transfered from the boil pot to the primary, and did not transfer the bottom material. Should I have transfered all of it, or was it right to only transfer the liquid?



Force carbonating tastes different than sugar priming, and sugar priming tastes different than malt or honey priming. Once you do a couple, you'll really appreciate how these big breweries can get their beer to taste the same every time. And you'll notice slight chages in the mass produced beer as your taste buds refine to catch this stuff. If you drink at microbreweries, like the ones that produce a couple hundred barrels a year and sell food in the front type, you will taste a lot of difference between batches.

Good to know...thanks!

wreckerman
02-27-2005, 07:03 PM
I know most of you guys are becoming great experts on beer brewing and this has really taken off not only in the forums, but in the papers. Saw this article today and thought you might get a kick out of it. Since usually all I do is consume the beer, concider this my contribution to all you brewmasters.

Slice
02-27-2005, 09:35 PM
Wrecker,

Thanks for posting that.

I'm trying to find a good shop, do you know where that is?


Thanks.

Tony
02-27-2005, 09:55 PM
Nice post Wreck, Thanks!!!

Okay, upate time!

I just picked up a 5 gallon carboy. I have decided to rack my first batch over to the carboy for secondary fermentation. I spoke with my local dealer and he suggested the 5 gallon instead of the 6, as fermentation is very slow now, and that the extra air in the 6 gallon isnt good for the beer. I know there is a controversy with many people over this, but I figure bacteria can be airborne, so why not just go with the 5 gallon to be safe. Plus they are smaller and less expensive.

I plan on starting my second batch tonight as well, a nice Wheat, and will go right into the first batches yeast cake as soon as its emptied from my primary bucket.

Rusty
02-28-2005, 01:45 PM
Well, I started drinking my first one last friday. When I started I had 47 bottles of "Amber Cerveza"..........I think I have 6 left. My drank one and a buddy of mine had 4, And I had the rest. Damn thats good beer. Great taste with a good kick to it. I guess I need to start my Pale Ale this weekend................I'll take a pic of the next glass and post it, so you can see how clear this beer turned out.

Tony
02-28-2005, 02:04 PM
Cool Rusty, man you went through those fast...lol...must have been good beer!

Well I racked my Creme Ale to the secondary, and fermented my Wheat Ale in the same yeast as my Creme Ale. The fermenter airlock started bubbling within an hour!!! The damn things going crazy this morning. My first batch bubbles slowly for 3 days, steadily, but no where near like this one. Im probably going to ferment one more batch in the old yeast before changing over to another type. Probably a Stout.

Anyway, hows everyone elses going?

wreckerman
02-28-2005, 11:21 PM
slice yes i know wear the place is , it is about 15 min from my house

Slice
03-01-2005, 12:43 AM
Update:

I pitched the yeast on this American Lite a week ago last Sunday evening.

It's still burping, though it's real slow. Maybe 4 to 5 minutes apart.

How long can this go on?

:P :P

I'd love to get it bottled, but I'll just wait it out.

Tony
03-01-2005, 01:19 AM
Mine was doing that after 5 days, and I racked it to a secondary carboy. Ive been told more and more by regular brewers to do this to get the primary off the trub once the fermentation slows like this to help keep off tastes from setting in. I still get a big bubble through my air lock on my carboy every few minutes or so. Im going to leave it in there for a week or so before bottling.

Funny how a thread like this one can lead to so much education and information. :D

LostLake
03-01-2005, 01:22 AM
Wrecker,

Thanks for posting that.

I'm trying to find a good shop, do you know where that is?


Thanks.

Yeh, thanks Wrecker... You're an alright guy (long as you're not pissed off! ;) )

LostLake
03-01-2005, 01:31 AM
Nice post Wreck, Thanks!!!

Okay, upate time!

I just picked up a 5 gallon carboy. I have decided to rack my first batch over to the carboy for secondary fermentation. I spoke with my local dealer and he suggested the 5 gallon instead of the 6, as fermentation is very slow now, and that the extra air in the 6 gallon isnt good for the beer. I know there is a controversy with many people over this, but I figure bacteria can be airborne, so why not just go with the 5 gallon to be safe. Plus they are smaller and less expensive.

I plan on starting my second batch tonight as well, a nice Wheat, and will go right into the first batches yeast cake as soon as its emptied from my primary bucket.

Yeh Tony, you're right about the air thing. When you transfer you want to see bubbles right away. That means there's still CO2 being released by the yeast. Now you know CO2 is heavier than oxygen, so it will cover the beer with a protective blanket, and force the oxygen out the airlock first.

Sometimes with heavier beers, maybe with your wheat even, when you swap to the glass carboy you stir up the beer and the mixing gets that yeast really going again. In a smaller carboy you may overflow the airlock and boil out the liquid. Also, I like the 6 gallon because I brew a little more than 5 gallons so when I siphon out the beer I don't feel so bad leaving a little bit on the bottom.

And don't worry about leaving the beer in the carboy for a while, it's safe in there, all cozy in its moon like atmosphere.

LostLake
03-01-2005, 01:38 AM
Cool Rusty, man you went through those fast...lol...must have been good beer!

Well I racked my Creme Ale to the secondary, and fermented my Wheat Ale in the same yeast as my Creme Ale. The fermenter airlock started bubbling within an hour!!! The damn things going crazy this morning. My first batch bubbles slowly for 3 days, steadily, but no where near like this one. Im probably going to ferment one more batch in the old yeast before changing over to another type. Probably a Stout.

Anyway, hows everyone elses going?

I am interested to see how that wheat tastes!!! The yeast gives a lot of flavor to the beer, and you used an uncommon combination there!!

Mine is not bubbling in the carboy anymore, but there's still a liitle spottiness on the top of the beer. Kind of looks like mold almost floating. I swirl it a little just because, and it comes back, so it's bubbling but really slow. I could bottle any time, but I don't have any Orange Blossom Honey, and that's what I want to use for carbonation this time... Plus I still have 12 bottles left from the last batch. I could drink those up quick and bottle again...

Tony
03-01-2005, 01:54 AM
I am interested to see how that wheat tastes!!! The yeast gives a lot of flavor to the beer, and you used an uncommon combination there!!

The kits I used for both had a generic brewing yeast, which was the same in both kits. I now see that you can buy selected yeast for selected beers, and I look forward to checking that out. Im believing it will turn out okay.


Mine is not bubbling in the carboy anymore, but there's still a liitle spottiness on the top of the beer. Kind of looks like mold almost floating. I swirl it a little just because, and it comes back, so it's bubbling but really slow. I could bottle any time, but I don't have any Orange Blossom Honey, and that's what I want to use for carbonation this time... Plus I still have 12 bottles left from the last batch. I could drink those up quick and bottle again...

I'll bet the Orange Blossom Honey gives it a nice taste! Aftr I bottle these two, Im going to look into different priming substamces besided the normal sugars.

LostLake
03-01-2005, 02:56 AM
The cane sugar some kits use can give an acidic taste or maybe astringent would be a better word. Malt seems to make the beer a little milder. I'm hoping the honey gives me a little sweet mouth taste..

You guys ever see this prayer??

THE BEER PRAYER

Our lager,
Which art in barrels,
Hallowed be thy drink.
Thy will be drunk, (I will be drunk),
At home as is in the tavern.
Give us this day our foamy head,
And forgive us our spillages,
As we forgive those who spill upon us.
And lead us not into incarceration,
But deliver us from hangovers.
For thine is the beer,
The bitter and the lager,
Forever and ever,
Barmen.

Tony
03-01-2005, 03:57 AM
Cool prayer for sure!!!!

HeadDoc
03-01-2005, 07:31 PM
Hey Tony, Trad's idea of a bar-chive is right on. I started mine right after that flop of trying to recreate the awesome brew I had. Even with a kit, letting a boil go longer or pitching yeast at a different time makes a world of difference!

I would think the amount of time you keep the beer in the primary before transferring to the carboy makes a difference because you leave behind most of the hops in the bucket when you transfer. Hmmm, I never write that down, and you don't see it in recipes either.... Maybe Headdoc knows if that makes a difference...

Force carbonating tastes different than sugar priming, and sugar priming tastes different than malt or honey priming. Once you do a couple, you'll really appreciate how these big breweries can get their beer to taste the same every time. And you'll notice slight chages in the mass produced beer as your taste buds refine to catch this stuff. If you drink at microbreweries, like the ones that produce a couple hundred barrels a year and sell food in the front type, you will taste a lot of difference between batches.

We homebrewers don't have microprocessor controlled heating and flow valves, we have egg timers and gas stoves. Making two batches alike is pretty tough without paying attention to the little details.

Luckily, these slight changes can be a good thing!!

IMHO these variables make the biggest flavor differences

1. different yeasts different flavor profile e.g., a wheat beer fermented with Wyeast 3068 Weihenstephan Weizen Yeast will have a spicy clove flavor and vanilla and bannana esters while the exact same grain bill with an american wheat yeast will not have that clove taste but is more like a pale ale yeast.
2. differnt hop strains = different flavors thats obvious but here's the catch...when you add them to the boil makes a huge difference e.g., any hop boiled for an hour or more will taste bitter but not too much variation in flavor, but if a hop addition is added at the last 30 minutes it won't really add too much to the bitterness but more to the flavor. and any end-of-boil additions impart flavor only no more bitterness. For the real flavor bang...try dry hopping, i.e., add hops to the secondary fermenter and you get aroma only
3. different adjunct malts = different flavors darker crystal malts give more carmel taste, roasted barley, Chocolate, and black-patent type malts give more astingent taste you find in a good stout, carapils and lighter crystals give sweetness and mouthfeel, victory and biscuit malts give a nutty biscuity taste...you guys know what's really funny...the beer novice will turn their nose up at a stout and say its too bitter but actually many german lagers are quite a bit more bitter from hops. stouts have a more astringent mouth feel from the roasted barley and black malts and are usually not anywhere near as bitter as some of the golden german lagers!
4. timing of hops in the boil = different flavor see # 2 above
5. length of boil = differnt flavor this one is a hunch I have that may be more true for extract brewers e.g., because you usually don't do "full" boils (6-7 gallons) the heat tends to make the brews darker and taste more caramely
6. fermentation temps = different flavors cooler fermentation results in cleaner beer flavor with less off tastes or esters and less potential for fusel alcohol (bad hangovoer makin' shit)


as far as leaving the trub in the primary and how long to leave your beer on it

you can leave your beer in the primary for several weeks with no problems and no noticible flavors especially if it stays cool. It is better to leave most of it behind when you rack to the secondary because you want to get the beer to clear as good as you can....all of the bitterness is already there so it won't make a bit of difference

on priming. Do NOT use honey! Honey is a more complex sugar and takes longer too ferment and it can be unpredictable...if you prime with more malt extract.... a GOOD way to do it, you may notice a ring around the bottle neck and think you have an infection..but it is usually just left over from the malt, BETTER just use the recommended corn sugar...carbonates fast and is very prdictable, BEST force carbonnate in the keg. fastest most control and your wife can't tell how many hom,ebrews ya had groucho

Slice
03-01-2005, 09:40 PM
I just went and bought a 6 gal. carboy.

I'll rack to it tonight. The very slow burping action, once in 5 to 6 minutes, has been explained to be as the Carbon dioxide coming back out of solution.

So we'll transfer it and take it from there.

HeadDoc
03-01-2005, 09:45 PM
I just went and bought a 6 gal. carboy.

I'll rack to it tonight. The very slow burping action, once in 5 to 6 minutes, has been explained to be as the Carbon dioxide coming back out of solution.

So we'll transfer it and take it from there.

exactly right Slice...and that's a good thing at this point because it means yeast is still converting sugar to alcohol and CO2 B)

Rusty
03-01-2005, 10:06 PM
I think we have enough activity in this topic to warrent at least a sub-forum in the kitchen forum. It's getting kinda tough to find certain post now......

What say ye HCG gods...........????

Slice
03-01-2005, 10:22 PM
I'm game for that!

This is a pretty fun hobby.

HeadDoc,

Thanks for that info you posted. I printed and saved it. It will be very handy on down the road.

Tony
03-01-2005, 10:38 PM
...you can leave your beer in the primary for several weeks with no problems and no noticible flavors especially if it stays cool...

I have been asking many brewers and micro-brewers and all are against leaving the primary in any longer than necessary while fermenting. They all advise to get it off the trub as soon as possible when fermenting slows. Im cuirous as to your info on this. I like hearing all sides of something to form my own conclusions.


...on priming. Do NOT use honey! Honey is a more complex sugar and takes longer too ferment and it can be unpredictable...

THIS is what all the people Ive talked to have said as well. Great point!

Man I love this thread!!!!

wreckerman
03-01-2005, 11:43 PM
Be patient just a little longer guys, I have talked with Wide and we have some software updates coming soon and will be able to do sub-topics under topics in the very near future. I agree you guys deserve your own heading for this.

Rusty
03-01-2005, 11:45 PM
Be patient just a little longer guys, I have talked with Wide and we have some software updates coming soon and will be able to do sub-topics under topics in the very near future. I agree you guys deserve your own heading for this.

Thanks Wrecker...........You da man.............

Wide
03-02-2005, 12:03 AM
I found this program for your home brewing needs

A homebrewer's recipe calculator. I needed one so I wrote one. Use this to formulate recipes for ales, lagers and stouts. It also includes a brewing primer for those just starting out in the homebrewing hobby. QBrew builds and runs under Unix (Linux, BSD, Solaris, etc), Mac OSX and Windows. See a screenshot of QBrew in action

http://usermode.org/code.html


drunks

HeadDoc
03-02-2005, 12:38 AM
...you can leave your beer in the primary for several weeks with no problems and no noticible flavors especially if it stays cool...

I have been asking many brewers and micro-brewers and all are against leaving the primary in any longer than necessary while fermenting. They all advise to get it off the trub as soon as possible when fermenting slows. Im cuirous as to your info on this. I like hearing all sides of something to form my own conclusions.


...on priming. Do NOT use honey! Honey is a more complex sugar and takes longer too ferment and it can be unpredictable...

THIS is what all the people Ive talked to have said as well. Great point!

Man I love this thread!!!!

Hey Tony...I've left beer in th eprimary for too long because of laziness and usually don't have any problems, but I agree the sooner you can rack it to a secondary the better. Once left a pale ale in the primary for 6 months! (don't ask) and it was pretty crappy but I brought it to a party and my graduate students slurped it up! :wacko:

Slice
03-02-2005, 02:38 AM
College kids....free beer....Yup, I can see that!

I just racked to the secondary tonight. Gravity was right on the screws and the flavor was awesome!

I think I can like this...

B) B) :D

How long should it sit in seconday fermentation if the gravity is already where it is supposed to be?

I'm guessing that I will bottle as soon as it clears up?

On another subject, I found a brew supply store and visited it today. It turns out to be much more than just a supply house.

I could smell brewing just as soon as I walked in and sure enough they are a full up micro.

They go by the name of Two Brothers and supply their beer over 6 states and around 150 restraunts and bars. Very nice people and quite helpful.
They have quite an operation and are very willing to explain it all.

Tony
03-02-2005, 04:31 AM
I found this program for your home brewing needs

A homebrewer's recipe calculator. I needed one so I wrote one. Use this to formulate recipes for ales, lagers and stouts. It also includes a brewing primer for those just starting out in the homebrewing hobby. QBrew builds and runs under Unix (Linux, BSD, Solaris, etc), Mac OSX and Windows. See a screenshot of QBrew in action

http://usermode.org/code.html


drunks

Thanks Wide, Ive been playing with the program since you posted it...lol

LostLake
03-02-2005, 04:33 AM
I'll have to let you guys know how the honey goes. I know it has less fermentables than sugar, and I will need to use more of it for the right carbonation, but I'm looking for the taste it will give.

There's plenty of recipes out there that use various honeys, so I'm not scared off about it, and I will probably end up using 3/4 cup of malt and 3/4 cup of honey... it will be fine....

I'll be the pioneer out here in Wisconsin, trying something so I can report back to the group... Heck, Tony is using a cream ale yeast with wheat, I've never done that!! He may have the most fantastic beer ever brewed on his hands and not know it yet!!!! B)

Tony
03-02-2005, 04:35 AM
...Once left a pale ale in the primary for 6 months! (don't ask) and it was pretty crappy but I brought it to a party and my graduate students slurped it up! :wacko:

LOL...at least it didnt go to waste.

Tony
03-02-2005, 04:45 AM
...I just racked to the secondary tonight. Gravity was right on the screws and the flavor was awesome!

Awesome...keep us up to date on this one.


How long should it sit in seconday fermentation if the gravity is already where it is supposed to be?

From what Im learning it can stay in the secondary for quite some time. Im seeing a few recipies that tell you to age it in the secondary for a month or so. The advantage is to allow the beer to age a bit and let the taste develop more.

But Ive seen a few recipies call for 6 primary, 6 secondary, bottle and age 2 weeks. Hell, one was 3, 3, 2 weeks.

Tony
03-02-2005, 04:49 AM
I'll have to let you guys know how the honey goes. I know it has less fermentables than sugar, and I will need to use more of it for the right carbonation, but I'm looking for the taste it will give.

There's plenty of recipes out there that use various honeys, so I'm not scared off about it, and I will probably end up using 3/4 cup of malt and 3/4 cup of honey... it will be fine....

Yeah, Ive seen some stout recipies calling for honey.



I'll be the pioneer out here in Wisconsin, trying something so I can report back to the group... Heck, Tony is using a cream ale yeast with wheat, I've never done that!! He may have the most fantastic beer ever brewed on his hands and not know it yet!!!! B)

Cool LL, its all about experimentation. As for mine, Im hoping it turns out okay and cant wait to try it. Its slowed some fermenting, but stil has a couple more days before racking to the secondary.

Rusty
03-02-2005, 11:37 PM
OK, I'm brewing again this weekend. Here is a list of my ingrediants.

6.6 lbs of plain Amber LME
2 lbs. of Plain Amber DME
1 lbs. of Crushed crystal malt 120L
2 oz. of Chinook (bittering)
1 oz of Chinook (finishing flavoring)
1 oz. of Chinook (finishing aroma)

Using Nottinghams ale yeast.........

I also purchased some Cascade hops to dry hop in secondary.

Calculated OG = 1.060
Calculated Final Gravity = 1.016
Calculated ABV = 6.3%

Tony
03-02-2005, 11:45 PM
What kind was this called? Or is it something you put together?

LostLake
03-03-2005, 12:06 AM
WHOA!!! (backpeddling..)

Just read a few threads on some brewing pages about the proper way to brew with honey... Yikes!!

It has to be sterilized, but not hot enough to convert enzymes or something, and it's full of bacteria, and on and on.... I'm not priming with it now!!!

I may throw some in a boil, but I don't like the scary stuff I read today...

DME it is for me... and my secondary is flat as a pancake. She's ready to bottle!!! ;)

Tony
03-03-2005, 12:23 AM
WHOA!!! (backpeddling..)

Just read a few threads on some brewing pages about the proper way to brew with honey... Yikes!!

It has to be sterilized, but not hot enough to convert enzymes or something, and it's full of bacteria, and on and on.... I'm not priming with it now!!!

I may throw some in a boil, but I don't like the scary stuff I read today...

DME it is for me... and my secondary is flat as a pancake. She's ready to bottle!!! ;)

Okay man...share the source... :D

Rusty
03-03-2005, 12:28 AM
What kind was this called? Or is it something you put together?

It's an extract recipe I ran across for "California style Pale ale"

Very Big Beer.

Tony
03-03-2005, 12:51 AM
Cool Rusty, let me know how it turns out. By the way...have you seen the following link for recipes (http://hbd.org/cgi-bin/recipator/recipes)?

Rusty
03-03-2005, 02:01 PM
Cool Rusty, let me know how it turns out. By the way...have you seen the following link for recipes (http://hbd.org/cgi-bin/recipator/recipes)?

Thats pretty cool................thanks. :D

Tony
03-03-2005, 04:27 PM
DAMN thats a nice Avatar man...very nice!!!!

Rusty
03-03-2005, 04:31 PM
DAMN thats a nice Avatar man...very nice!!!!

I was trying to compete with yours..............

Tony
03-03-2005, 04:38 PM
We're gonna have to make up a blonde ale and call it "HCG Busty Blonde" in lieu of these hot ass blondes!

Rusty
03-03-2005, 04:44 PM
We're gonna have to make up a blonde ale and call it "HCG Busty Blonde" in lieu of these hot ass blondes!

OK, it's a done deal.............I'm brewing my pale ale this weekend.........so I'll brew a blond the weekend after that.

Tony
03-03-2005, 05:06 PM
Cool, Im gonna get down to my brew store and pick up some grains and extracts to get going on one as well.

Of course it will have to be an extremely light colored blonde to truly do justice to these beautiful girls!

Plus see if I can configure a high alcohol one to do justice to being "Blonde" :D

Rusty
03-03-2005, 06:13 PM
Cool, Im gonna get down to my brew store and pick up some grains and extracts to get going on one as well.

Of course it will have to be an extremely light colored blonde to truly do justice to these beautiful girls!

Plus see if I can configure a high alcohol one to do justice to being "Blonde" :D

Let me know what your grain bill looks like. I'll try and convert it to extract and brew the same thing.

Tony
03-03-2005, 10:10 PM
Okay, here's the recipe I came up with. Its a little over the usual IPA maximum gravity and maximum bitterness, but right in the middle as far as color:

Steep: 1 lb. British Pale Steep (bring to a boil an steep covered for 30 minutes in mesh bag.)

Boil: 60 minutes - 3 gallons
9.9 lb. Light malt extract
1 lb. Light dry malt extract
1 tsp Irish moss at 15 minutes left.

Hops: 1 oz. Cascade (6% AA, 60 min.)
3 oz. Chinook (12% AA, 60 min.)
1 oz. Cascade (aroma)

Yeast: London Ale Yeast

Carbonation: 3/4 cup primimg (corn) sugar.
Primary 4-6 days, Secondary 2 weeks. Bottle 3 weeks or more.

Color: 11
Bitterness: 64
O.G. 1.086
F.G. 1.021
Alcohol: 8.7% v/v, 6.7% w/w

Rusty
03-03-2005, 10:29 PM
Color: 11
Bitterness: 64
O.G. 1.086
F.G. 1.021
Alcohol: 8.7% v/v, 6.7% w/w

WOW..............That is a serious beer. So your using extract and not AG?

The American Pale that I'm doing this weekend is like this

Color: 17
Bitterness: 113
OG: 1.068
FG: 1.017
ABV: 6.8%

Tony
03-03-2005, 11:12 PM
Im still trying to figure out an AG that will have a higher alcohol rate. Most all grains Ive found are only around 3% or 4%. Using the QBrew program,Ive found that most all grain recipes are less of a percentage than they are advertised.

Im still looking.

Whats the ingredients in yours?

Rusty
03-03-2005, 11:21 PM
Im still trying to figure out an AG that will have a higher alcohol rate. Most all grains Ive found are only around 3% or 4%. Using the QBrew program,Ive found that most all grain recipes are less of a percentage than they are advertised.

Im still looking.

Whats the ingredients in yours?


6.6 lbs of plain Amber LME
2 lbs. of Plain Amber DME
1 lbs. of Crushed crystal malt 120L
2 oz. of Chinook (bittering)
1 oz of Chinook (finishing flavoring)
1 oz. of Chinook (finishing aroma)

Using Nottinghams ale yeast.........

I also purchased some Cascade hops to dry hop in secondary.

Tony
03-03-2005, 11:44 PM
Sounds Awesome!!!

I entered your recipe and in QBrew and your figures we all right on the money!!!! I added this to my list of recipes as well.

What is this one called anyway?

Rusty
03-03-2005, 11:48 PM
Sounds Awesome!!!

I entered your recipe and in QBrew and your figures we all right on the money!!!! I added this to my list of recipes as well.

What is this one called anyway?

It's a California Style Imperial Pale Ale................

Rusty
03-04-2005, 12:00 AM
I popped the first cap on my 2nd brew........"American Lite" Pretty damn good. It's a bit hoppy for an american beer...........My wife likes it so, I'll make it again...............

It was 3.3 lbs of light LME
1 lbs of light DME
1 lbs of corn sugar
.25 oz of Saaz (Czech) at the finish of the boil.........

It taste like a Strong budweiser............