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View Full Version : TARGET OLDER CAR DRIVERS TO CUT MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENTS



Drebbin
03-11-2005, 11:51 AM
Global News Wire - Europe Intelligence Wire
Surveyor

March 3, 2005

HEADLINE: ROAD SAFETY: TARGET OLDER CAR DRIVERS TO CUT MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENTS, SAYS REPORT

A Government study into the high casualty toll among motorcyclists has recommended targeting older car drivers as well as improving the riding skills and attitudes of bikers themselves. It warns that the problem of rider casualties could get worse given the growth in scooter and motorbike sales in recent years and in motorcycle traffic ? and our ageing population. Psychologists at the University of Nottingham analysed police reports on around 1,8000 accidents in the Midlands over a five-year period, identifying more experienced car drivers as a major factor in ?right of way? accidents. In many cases the driver inexplicably ?looked but did not see? a motorcycle that was close to the junction. ?If all such accidents were to be eliminated, our results suggest a theoretical fall of slightly over 25% in the total motorcycle accident rate,? they reported. At least a third of the motorcyclists in ?ROW? accidents where they were not at fault either had their lights or reflective clothing on or both. One explanation for such accidents is that drivers ?overlook? the foreground while concentrating on the more distant view beyond the junction mouth. Analysis showed the average age of drivers to blame for these accidents was 41 ? significantly higher than the 36 average for other accident classes. This confirms earlier research suggesting that drivers highly experienced in ?reading? the road are more susceptible to ?inattentional blindness? than beginners. Another factor may be the poorer eyesight of older drivers. ? This is an area of potential concern due to aging population demographics throughout the UK,? the report notes. DfT Road Safety Research Report No.54: In-depth Study of Motorcycle Accidents. Available at: www.dft.gov.uk

Tony
03-12-2005, 04:23 AM
[quote="Drebbin"]...One explanation for such accidents is that drivers ?overlook? the foreground while concentrating on the more distant view beyond the junction mouth. Analysis showed the average age of drivers to blame for these accidents was 41 ? significantly higher than the 36 average for other accident classes. This confirms earlier research suggesting that drivers highly experienced in ?reading? the road are more susceptible to ?inattentional blindness? than beginners. Another factor may be the poorer eyesight of older drivers. ? This is an area of potential concern due to aging population demographics throughout the UK,?

Imagine that, the older, more experienced drivers are the ones causing accidents!